Archive for April, 2014

The “30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days” Interview – Andrew Allen

As part of  The Pixel Projects 30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days project in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign, we talk to the artistes who have participated in the project about why they are using their music to speak out and to say NO to violence against women. 

Our fifth featured artiste is Andrew Allen. Andrew’s DIY ability and optimistic attitude have served him well. He’s scored three Top 10 hits in Canada, 2009′s “I Wanna Be Your Christmas”, 2011′s “I Want You” and his biggest single released in 2010 “Loving You Tonight,” which was lodged in the upper reaches of the charts for more than 22 weeks. A lilting, sunny tune about an ideal romance, “Loving You Tonight” helped put Andrew on tour with acts like The Script, Bruno Mars, One Republic, Train, Joshua Radin and The Barenaked Ladies, with the official music video garnering more than 4 million views! Radio play aside, Andrew is a true live performer with an exceptional voice, incredible songs and limitless energy – not too mention a spatter of comic wit and story-telling ability that helps create a dynamic and interactive live show. He’s definitely an artist that embodies the term ‘live’. You can follow Andrew’s updates on Facebook, or watch his videos on YouTube.

Andrew contributed his song, “Write About It” to the “30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days” campaign in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate here.

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Andrew AllenTell us about yourself and why you decided to take part in The Pixel Project
s 30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days project.

I’m a singer/songwriter, originally from Canada, now living in LA. Most of my songs have a lot do with love, and with that comes a responsibility, to practice what you preach and not only sing about love, but act in love. So when I was asked to take part in this project, it felt like it was synonymous with the type of art I create, and I knew it was an opportunity to help contribute to a project that was making headway in stopping violence against women.

Why is ending violence against women important to you?

I feel like violence, in general, is wrong, but I especially think that women deserve to be honoured and treated as equals, not oppressed and held down. Aside from the fact that I’m married, the women in my life are such incredible humans, and have been instrumental in the shaping of my life, so to imagine that anyone could use violence to control another person just makes me cringe, which is why I think it’s so important to end violence against women.

In your opinion how does music help in efforts to end violence against women?

Music can be such a positive and motivating force. It can provide solace in a tough time and it can almost transport you out of a situation. I think music is an art form that can really saturate a soul, and be a big part of the healing process.
What actions can music artists take to help end violence against women?

I think music artists have a huge responsibility when it comes to social justice, including violence against women. They have a unique platform to educate and demonstrate how to respect one another. Unfortunately there are artists that seem to encourage the oppression and violence towards women, and I feel that it’s not just an injustice to the women of this world, but also to the art of music. I think the biggest action that artists can take is to use that platform to change the world into a positive environment for women to feel safe.

 

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The “Music For Pixels 2014″ charity digital album is available from 1 April 2014 – 1 April 2015 as a companion to the “30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days” campaign. The album features a selection of 12 positive and empowering songs from the campaign by artistes including  Adam Web, AHMIR, AJ Rafael, Bob Sima, Courtney Jenae, Debbie Reifer, Delaney Gibson, Ellis, Macy Kate, Mary Sholz, Pete Ahonen, and Troy Horne

The album is the perfect and affordable gift for music lovers and for celebrating special occasions such as birthdays and Mother’s Day. It is available for download worldwide via major online music retailers including iTunes and Amazon.com. 100% of the album proceeds will benefit The Pixel Project to help keep their anti-Violence Against Women campaigns, projects, and programmes running.

bt-m4p2014-dl-amazon                   bt-m4p2014-dl-itunes

The “30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days” Interview – Ally Rhodes

As part of  The Pixel Projects 30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days project in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign, we talk to the artistes who have participated in the project about why they are using their music to speak out and to say NO to violence against women. 

Our fourth featured artiste is Ally RhodesAlly Rhodes is a singer, songwriter, and guitarist from Omaha, NE based out of Denver, CO. Her most obvious and foremost passion is music, but she also really loves traveling, bad puns, and social justice. She seeks to make a difference in the world by bringing light to important issues in her music, as well as using the platforms on which she may garner any influence to talk about those issues. You can follow Ally’s updates on Facebook and check out her videos on YouTube.

Ally contributed her song “Places That A Mind Should Never Go” to the “30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days” campaign in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate here.

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Ally Rhodes promo2

Tell us about yourself and why you decided to take part in The Pixel Projects 30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days project.  

I am a very fiercely passionate feminist and I try to take every opportunity that I get in both my career and in my everyday life to raise awareness of feminist issues. The Pixel Project’s commitment to ending violence against women is in perfect alignment with my own mission, so it was a great match!

Why is ending violence against women important to you?                                            

Violence takes many, many forms. Some of them are obvious, but others are not. It’s a pervasive, integral part of our culture that we’ve all internalized as a result of growing up in a patriarchal, heterosexist, cissexist, racist world. I am committed to doing whatever I can to dismantle the harmful, unjust power systems currently in place for the sake of all people, but especially my fellow women.

In your opinion how does music help in efforts to end violence against women?      

Music is arguably the biggest force of mainstream media. It shapes mindsets, which in turn go on to shape the entirety of our culture. So much of the music on our iPods and radios and TVs is misogynistic in nature, glorifying female submission and encouraging men to be dominant and abusive. These notions are so common that we don’t even think twice about them, but flipping the script and using music to empower women and condemn abusive behavior is jarring. It snaps people out of the norm and makes them actually think about the messages they’re ingesting.

What actions can music artists take to help end violence against women?

First, we need to end the trope of the helpless, pathetic woman needing the strong, important man and stop exalting objectification and abuse of women in our songs. Then we must quit portraying women in music videos as submissive and acquiescent to the whims of men. Then, we need to use the platforms we have as a result of our music to shine the light on the various forms of violence that plague the lives of women everyday. Music is such a powerful medium and the more artists who take a stand, the better a place our world will be for everyone.

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The “Music For Pixels 2014″ charity digital album is available from 1 April 2014 – 1 April 2015 as a companion to the “30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days” campaign. The album features a selection of 12 positive and empowering songs from the campaign by artistes including  Adam Web, AHMIR, AJ Rafael, Bob Sima, Courtney Jenae, Debbie Reifer, Delaney Gibson, Ellis, Macy Kate, Mary Sholz, Pete Ahonen, and Troy Horne The album is the perfect and affordable gift for music lovers and for celebrating special occasions such as birthdays and Mother’s Day. It is available for download worldwide via major online music retailers including iTunes and Amazon.com. 100% of the album proceeds will benefit The Pixel Project to help keep their anti-Violence Against Women campaigns, projects, and programmes running.

bt-m4p2014-dl-amazon                   bt-m4p2014-dl-itunes

The “30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days” Interview – Ali Handal

As part of  The Pixel Projects 30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days project in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign, we talk to the artistes who have participated in the project about why they are using their music to speak out and to say NO to violence against women. 

Our third featured artiste is Ali Handal. Singer, songwriter & lead guitarist Ali Handal has graced stages from L.A. to Australia, Japan and beyond; she’s sung on a Neil Young album, written & performed with Paul Williams, danced with Janet Jackson, performed at Neverland Valley Ranch, heard her songs in TV shows like “Sex In The City,” “iCarly” and “Dawson’s Creek,” performed at the opening of the Les Paul Museum Exhibit, and demonstrated guitars on “The Price Is Right.”  Recently, Hal Leonard publishing released Ali’s own Guitar Method book: “Guitar For Girls.” You can follow Ali’s updates on Facebook and check out her videos on YouTube.

Ali contributed her song, “I’m Here” to the “30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days” campaign in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate here.

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Ali HandalTell us about yourself and why you decided to take part in The Pixel Project
s 30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days project.                  

I love that this project is an innovative, internet-based way to raise awareness, and involves several other artists I admire. I wanted to be a part of the solution and raise my voice along with 29 other phenomenal artistes in The Pixel Project’s month-long awareness-building campaign.

Why is ending violence against women important to you?                                            

I think it’s important to raise awareness and join in a call to action in ending violence against women. I’m generally a peaceful person and don’t favour violence against anyone, and, especially as a feminist, I believe it’s very important to raise the consciousness of WOMEN to not tolerate any kind of abuse.

In your opinion how does music help in efforts to end violence against women?      

Music, and the arts in general, can be very powerful.  I remember when I was young, I saw the movie “Thelma and Louise,” and in the film, Louise says to Thelma (in regards to her abusive husband), “You get what you settle for.” As a young woman, that movie, and that statement in particular, impacted me STRONGLY, and I was very choosy when it came to who I chose to marry later in life (hint: I didn’t settle!). Now, years later, I’ve written a song called “You Get What You Settle For” in order to pass along that same inspiration I received from “Thelma and Louise.”
I believe that including these types of empowering and encouraging messages throughout the arts is a wonderful, supportive way of encouraging women to make healthy choices regarding the people they surround themselves with, and the types of behaviour they will – and will not — tolerate.

What actions can music artists take to help end violence against women?

Musical artists can continue to write and record powerful songs that encourage women to know their worth, and know that no matter how they are feeling, it is NEVER okay for anyone to hurt or abuse them.  Both male and female artists have different strengths and viewpoints to offer – I think it’s wonderful that both men and women are involved in this crusade to end violence against women.

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The “Music For Pixels 2014″ charity digital album is available from 1 April 2014 – 1 April 2015 as a companion to the “30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days” campaign. The album features a selection of 12 positive and empowering songs from the campaign by artistes including  Adam Web, AHMIR, AJ Rafael, Bob Sima, Courtney Jenae, Debbie Reifer, Delaney Gibson, Ellis, Macy Kate, Mary Sholz, Pete Ahonen, and Troy Horne

The album is the perfect and affordable gift for music lovers and for celebrating special occasions such as birthdays and Mother’s Day. It is available for download worldwide via major online music retailers including iTunes and Amazon.com. 100% of the album proceeds will benefit The Pixel Project to help keep their anti-Violence Against Women campaigns, projects, and programmes running.

bt-m4p2014-dl-amazon                   bt-m4p2014-dl-itunes

The “30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days” Interview – Adam Web

As part of  The Pixel Projects 30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days project in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign, we talk to the artistes who have participated in the project about why they are using their music to speak out and to say NO to violence against women. 

Our second featured artiste is Adam Web. Adam Web = optimistic acoustic funk. Though living in Philadelphia, PA, his career began about 10,000 miles across the world in Australia.  It was here, while studying abroad, that Adam began writing of his inspiring travels and experiences. The music that emerged was shaped with percussive guitar grooves, soulful vocals, and spiritually conscious sentiment. With his rootsy approach he has drawn comparisons to such contemporaries as Jack Johnson, Dave Matthews, and Jason Mraz, but still maintains a definitive sound of his own. This sound has made its way across the U.S with his last album “Once We Were Stars” being played on over 100 college radio stations in 2010.  It also caught the ears of 2 major TV networks, as his single “Standstill” was used in an episode of MTV’s “The Real World Las Vegas (2011)” and his song “Life is My Play” was used on Oxygen’s “The  Bad Girls Club (2011)”.  Through multiple tours, Adam has performed in 14 states across the country including such festivals as South by Southwest  (Austin, TX) and Musikfest (Bethlehem, PA).  He has performed at such prominent venues as the Hard Rock Café in Nashville, TN and MilkboyPhilly in Philadelphia, PA. Follow Adam’s updates and videos on Facebook and YouTube.

Adam has written the song “A Toast To All You Do” especially for the “30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days” campaign in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate here.

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Adam WebTell us about yourself and why you decided to take part in The Pixel Projects 30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days project.                  

When I was asked to join The Pixel Project’s “30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days” project I was very excited to participate. I write many songs filled with positivity, hope, and love, but didn’t have one that truly worked for this setting. So, I decided to write a song about the importance of women in our lives. Using my mother and my wife as my inspiration, I thought about what the world would be like with out them. My conclusion was that it would be a world completely out of balance. It would be a world severely lacking love and compassion. I decided to take part in this project, because I feel the need to celebrate women and their ever important role in our lives.

Why is ending violence against women important to you?                                            

I think that when we envision any of the important women in our lives in danger, our protective nature kicks in. If we can expand these feelings beyond our immediate families and friends to that of all woman across the world, amazing things can happen. Ultimately I feel that a shift in consciousness changes the world and I want to be a part of that change. I want to help restore balance in this world, and that cannot happen if women are suppressed and harmed.

In your opinion how does music help in efforts to end violence against women?      

If you are trying to spread a message that needs to reach many nations and languages, you’ll need to have something that can universally speak to everyone. I believe that music bridges these gaps.  Even if the lyrics are written in a specific language, the music, melodies, and emotion felt in the delivery of the song can speak volumes to the listener. We can raise awareness about the issue of violence against women through this universal language.

What actions can music artists take to help end violence against women?

Musicians can use their voice. They can weave their message throughout their songs and use their story telling abilities to help people relate to what they are saying. They can raise awareness that this issue exists all over the world spanning all cultures and races. Starting a conversation is such an important step in beginning the healing process for an issue like ending violence against women. The more we talk, the more opportunities there are for creating solutions and music can be the spark that get’s people talking.

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The “Music For Pixels 2014″ charity digital album is available from 1 April 2014 – 1 April 2015 as a companion to the “30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days” campaign. The album features a selection of 12 positive and empowering songs from the campaign by artistes including  Adam Web, AHMIR, AJ Rafael, Bob Sima, Courtney Jenae, Debbie Reifer, Delaney Gibson, Ellis, Macy Kate, Mary Sholz, Pete Ahonen, and Troy Horne

The album is the perfect and affordable gift for music lovers and for celebrating special occasions such as birthdays and Mother’s Day. It is available for download worldwide via major online music retailers including iTunes and Amazon.com. 100% of the album proceeds will benefit The Pixel Project to help keep their anti-Violence Against Women campaigns, projects, and programmes running.

bt-m4p2014-dl-amazon                   bt-m4p2014-dl-itunes

The “30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days” Interview – AHMIR

As part of The Pixel Project’s 30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days“ project in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign, we talk to the artistes who have participated in the project about why they are using their music to speak out and to say NO to violence against women. 

Our first featured artiste is AHMIR, The Pixel Project’s YouTube ambassador. As featured in Us Weekly, Billboard, Vibe.com and AOL Entertainment, AHMIR is the #1 Most Popular R&B Group on YouTube with over 70 million video views and comments by celebrities such as Ryan Seacrest, Ashton Kutcher, Miley Cyrus, Demi Lovato, Perez Hilton, P!nk and more. The group has used their success to bring awareness to charity organisations including Lucy’s Love Bus, Haiti Relief Fund, American Red Cross, American Cancer Society, YMCA, The Pixel Project, and Kevin Youkilis Hits for Kids. Their cover video of P!nk’s “Perfect” was named one of the top Anti-Bullying PSA’s by The Huffington Post. Follow AHMIR’s updates and videos on Facebook and YouTube.  AHMIR is now signed to Robbins Entertainment and have just released their debut single entitled “WAR” to Top 40 radio nationwide. “WAR” is available now for purchase on iTunes.

AHMIR’s song for the “30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days” project is their version of Katy Perry’s “Unconditionally”. This is their second anti-Violence Against Women music video PSA for The Pixel Project. The “30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days” project was held in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate here.

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AHMIR

Tell us about yourself and why you decided to take part in The Pixel Project’s “30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days” project.                  

Sing-SingThrough YouTube, we understand that we have become role models to many people. Realising that millions of people are watching and listening to our music, we know that we can influence and make a difference to many people all over the world. This ability to touch people through our work on YouTube at anytime and anywhere is what truly inspires us and made us want to take part in the 30/30/30 campaign with our video cover of Katy Perry’s “Unconditionally”.

Why is ending violence against women important to you?                                            

KC: When I was a kid, I witnessed domestic violence in my home. The situation caused me to feel unsafe. I grew up with the notion that violence was not only tolerated, but accepted in my family. As I reached my teen years and watched the females in my family battle such violence, I began to realize that just because a person is physically stronger than you, it does not give them the right to enforce their will against you. I understand how a man treats a young woman early on in life will affect them for the rest of their life. It is important that we teach young men how to treat women properly.

In your opinion how does music help in efforts to end violence against women?      

Mr. Jones: The powers of melody and harmony have the ability to compliment the sentiment behind just words. Words can definitely be powerful, but music helps to amplify the message that is being communicated.  Music is a powerful, powerful tool.  Unfortunately, it’s a tool that is often used to convey messages that aren’t crucial to human growth.

What actions can music artists take to help end violence against women?

Big Mike: Musicians have a captive audience that listen to the words sung in their songs. The songs move your mind and soul to laugh, cry, dance, etc.  Therefore, musicians should feel it is a privilege to use their unique talents to help raise awareness to end violence against women. You don’t need to change the world, but you have a special platform to perhaps help one young woman out there who is crying inside with pain and feeling hopeless. You can help be that beacon of light to show them that there are supporters and people who care and want you to be a survivor.

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The “Music For Pixels 2014″ charity digital album is available from 1 April 2014 – 1 April 2015 as a companion to the “30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days” project. The album features a selection of 12 positive and empowering songs from the campaign by artistes including  Adam Web, AHMIR, AJ Rafael, Bob Sima, Courtney Jenae, Debbie Reifer, Delaney Gibson, Ellis, Macy Kate, Mary Sholz, Pete Ahonen, and Troy Horne

The album is the perfect and affordable gift for music lovers and for celebrating special occasions such as birthdays and Mother’s Day. It is available for download worldwide via major online music retailers including iTunes and Amazon.com. 100% of the album proceeds will benefit The Pixel Project to help keep their anti-Violence Against Women campaigns, projects, and programmes running.

bt-m4p2014-dl-itunes               bt-m4p2014-dl-amazon               bt-m4p2014-dl-gplay