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Archive for June, 2014

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2014 Interview 30: Stanley Diamond, 80, Canada

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2013! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2014 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our thirtieth “30 For 30″ 2014 Dad is Stanley Diamond from Canada.

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The Dad Bio

Stanley Diamond is a lecturer, author, and subject of articles on entrepreneurial activity and international marketing. He is the founder of the Jewish Genealogical Society of Montreal, founder and executive director of Jewish Records Indexing – Poland, and the creator of the research project on Beta-Thalassemia genetic trait in Ashkenazi Jewish families. Stanley is also a consultant on the television series “Who Do You Think You Are?” and “Finding Your Past,” and was featured in an episode of the documentary series “Past Lives” on Global TV Canada. In 1984, Stanley won the Canada Export Award and in 2002, he received the International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies Lifetime Achievement award. Stanley married Ruth Mirjam Peerlkamp in 1965 and has three daughters and four grandchildren.

DSCF1600 - Copy - Copy1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

At the end of the day, it is about being proud of your children at every stage of their lives and having the satisfaction that they reflect the values that you and your wife have instilled in them. It is also about being able to see that that they are caring citizens, have chosen friends wisely, and are loving and considerate individuals who, in turn, have brought up children that reflect upon themselves and their parents.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

My father and I were never “buddies” or had a “man-to-man” talk about any aspect of male/female relationships. Although I came to realize that he could not bring himself to provide guidance when it involved girls/women or how to treat them, he was always courteous with women and in this way, he did have an influence.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

It is the responsibility of all fathers, teachers, and males in authority in general to show their opposition to violence against women through words and deeds. Lists of ways of how to stop violence against women are all well and good but, in the end, it’s no more complicated than teaching your sons to obey the golden rule of treating women with respect, asking yourself if the behaviour you see meets that basic standard, and the importance of speaking up and speaking out if it doesn’t.

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2014 Interview 29: Alex Trainer, 47, USA

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2013! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2014 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our twenty ninth “30 For 30″ 2014 Dad is Alex Trainer from the USA.

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The Dad Bio

Alex is the proud father of a 16 year old daughter, Christel, and proud husband to his wife of 12 years. He believes the success to their marriage is due to the fact that Jesus Christ is the sovereign in their relationship, that He constructed it and sustains it. He believes that following Christ’s example of treating women without judgment (John 8:11), with love (Ephesians 5:25), and with gentleness is the best way to impact his daughter’s life.

Christel Whispers to Daddy 0504141503b1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

The best thing about being a dad is being able to teach my daughter the knowledge that I have learned, and knowing that I had a role in showing her how to expect to be treated by a man. My daughter will know that she is to be treated with dignity and respect, as well as what is right and wrong.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

My father was a college professor – introverted and shy, and a gentleman. I never heard him speak an unkind word to my mom or berate her. Instead, I saw a man who took the time to explain to her things she didn’t understand about American culture, which was important as she was a German immigrant. Though my father experienced much pain in his life, he never lashed out, put down, or threatened anyone when he was frustrated.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

One of the underlying causes of violence towards women is the lack of moral male leadership in the world. Many sons do not have men in their lives that they can actively listen to about how to encourage and support the women in their lives. Positive male role models for boys make solid, moral male men in the future – men who treat women with equality, respect, and dignity.

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2014 Interview 28: Andrew Smiler, 45, USA

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2013! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2014 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our twenty eighth “30 For 30″ 2014 Dad is Andrew Smiler from the USA.

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The Dad Bio

Andrew Smiler, PhD is a therapist, evaluator, author, and speaker residing in Winston-Salem, North Carolina (USA). He is the author of Challenging Casanova: Beyond the stereotype of promiscuous young male sexuality and co-author, with Chris Kilmartin, of The Masculine Self (5th edition). He is a past president of the Society for the Psychological Study of Men and Masculinity and has taught at Wake Forest University and SUNY Oswego. Dr. Smiler’s research focuses on definitions of masculinity. He also studies normative aspects of sexual development, such as age and perception of first kiss, first “serious” relationship, and first intercourse among 15-25 year olds.

20120410smiler69871. What is the best thing about being a dad?

The best thing about being a dad is when my daughter gives me a hug, kiss, or cuddle without being asked to do so. Whatever else is going on, that always makes me feel good and smile.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

My stepfather treated everyone, female or male, with respect. He was humble, never argued with my mother in front of me, and was good to her. As far as I could tell, my stepfather always kept his word, unlike my biological father. I try to treat people the same way my stepfather did.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

One way is to raise boys with the notion that girls are their equals, that boys should help everyone, and that boys need to stand up to other boys who belittle girls. Another way is not to use girls or femininity as a putdown or punishment; insulting a boy by telling him he “throws like a girl” teaches boys that girls are fundamentally different from and less than boys. If they hear that repeatedly, it can become the basis of their understanding of girls and women.

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2014 Interview 27: Glenn Jones, 49, USA

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2013! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2014 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our twenty seventh “30 For 30″ 2014 Dad is Glenn Jones from the USA.

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The Dad Bio

Glenn has worked in the A/C business for about 17 years as a Supervising Lead Installer. Though he does not have any hobbies, he enjoys being with his family every spare moment that he gets. He is the father of a 14-year-old son, named after him, and a 17-year-old up-and-coming artist named ToRi-LyNN who is one of The Pixel Project’s Music For Pixels artistes.

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1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

Everything is the best thing about being a dad! I had always wanted a family, even before I ever had one. I find it to be the most fulfilling experience of my life and wouldn’t trade it for anything in the world.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

My father, God rest his soul, always treated my mother and sister with a lot of love and respect. Those values and qualities always stuck with me. I thank my father for being a great role model and teaching me to be the man I am today.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

I feel this can only happen by everyone joining together and taking a strong stand in preventing violence against women from happening. I feel that males especially need to fight for this cause because it sets a good example for our men of the future to follow suit. For example, my daughter is working hard on building her music career and I am 100% supportive of her. I show her that I respect her opinions and ambitions, and that I want her and her younger brother to know that it is normal and right to expect any man to do the same.

Editor: Check out ToRI-LyNN’s latest anti-Violence Against Women music video for The Pixel Project:

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2014 Interview 26: Lee Keyes, Over 21, USA

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2013! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2014 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our twenty sixth “30 For 30″ 2014 Dad is Lee Keyes from the USA.

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The Dad Bio

Lee works at a major university as a psychologist, helping students and communities address mental health issues, including all forms of violence. He has been married for 29 years and have two adult children, whom he loves dearly.

Me & Kids

1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

Seeing my children become who they are, and their journey in giving their gifts to the world. I have tried to share the wisdom that I’ve accumulated about life by how I interact with the world in healthy ways. I enjoy teaching them to stand up for themselves, what they believe in, what is right as best as they know it, and to be respectful and honourable people. I like seeing them be their own, independent people, but also seeking support when that is needed.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

It was my mother who influenced me in seeing women and girls as equals. My father gave me an appreciation for our family history and our Scots-Irish cultural roots and I have tried to pass that on, but it was my mother who raised me to take care of myself and to focus on what I believe. Because she insisted on being treated fairly, I came to know that girls and women want the same, and I have tried to live up to that.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

Fathers and other male role models need to lead by example and reinforce the need for being responsible and accountable, even in situations of peer pressure. Because our evolution has primed our brains for certain negative behaviour, I know that boys need a lot of attention, monitoring, and reinforcement when they do the right thing and treat others with respect, even when they may not receive it themselves. It takes courage to speak up about wrongful treatment; men must nurture and promote those choices when they see them.

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2014 Interview 25: Randy Gregorcyk, 42, USA

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2013! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2014 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our twenty fifth “30 For 30″ 2014 Dad is Randy Gregorcyk from the USA.

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The Dad Bio

Randy is a working professional in the property management and safety industry. He is actively involved in a men’s soccer team, politically supports his community through various boards, and was recently a City Councilman. Randy and his wife adopted their daughter the day she was born. As the father of one daughter after painstakingly seeking a natural birth, he is thrilled to be a father with a great journey of leadership, love, and compassion through Christ ahead of him.

Randy and Emsley Pic1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

Experiencing unconditional love from my daughter is the best part of being a dad. At two and a half years old, I have already, and will continue, to experience a bond that only a father and daughter can have. Her blessing, love, and laughter has improved the world we live in and, to the end, I strive to equip her to be a contributor to our society.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

As a son, my father raised me to love, respect, and admire my mother. Because of this, my admiration and respect for women became key as a young adult and, more importantly, as a future husband. My wife could see the love that my father had for my mother and she later told me that part of her love for me was seeing those same characteristics in me. My father continues to influence my actions as a new father to Emsley and I am happy that I paid attention and can be an active father to her.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

Whether through church activities, school gatherings, or other community outreach options, we must lead by example and take interest in their lives. By partaking in positive community activities with our sons and daughters, we have the opportunity to surround them with positive role models and show them the positive characteristics that we hope to instil in them for the future.

The “30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days” Interview – Faith Rivera

As part of  The Pixel Project’s 30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days” project in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign, we talk to the artistes who have participated in the project about why they are using their music to speak out and to say NO to violence against women. 

Our thirteenth featured artiste is Faith Rivera. If Tony Robbins were a girl, could sing like Mariah, groove like Madonna and inspire like Oprah, you’d get…Faith Rivera! Faith is an Emmy award-winning singer/songwriter heard around the globe from the Hollywood Bowl to the Honolulu Symphony to virtual concerts online. Her sunny music has been used on Hawaii 5-0 and ER to supporting authors like Marianne Williamson & Jack Canfield. We are born to shine and Faith loves nothing more than creating music to celebrate that spark in everyone! To learn more about Faith, follow her on Facebook or check out her videos on YouTube.

Faith contributed her song, “Let It Out” to the “30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days” campaign in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate here.

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Faith Rivera

Tell us about yourself and why you decided to take part in The Pixel Projects 30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days project.

I’m an Emmy winning singer/songwriter and touring positive music artist. I’ve been playing and creating music since my childhood days in Hawaii, and even then I saw the power of music to make an empowering difference. Growing up with strong women leaders and role models, I know the immense gifts, nurturing and wisdom that can only come from women. So I knew immediately that I wanted to be a part of Pixel Project’s mighty campaign to make a stand for all women and girls.

Why is ending violence against women important to you?

Ending all violence is important to me and I do my best to share music and messages that promote peace as a way of life.  It is women and feminine values of nurturing and love that can truly turn the tide from violence to peace on our planet. So every girl and every woman needs to be protected and given the opportunity to share their voice and unique brilliance with the world.

In your opinion how does music help in efforts to end violence against women?

Music has a way of transcending the limitations of mere words by creating a feeling, touching folks in deep, surprising ways and even moving listeners to action. Not only can songs bring light to important causes, they can penetrate the hearts and thoughts of women and girls needing to be empowered, inspire action in supporters of the cause, and even move those that might be inclined to violence to more life-affirming and loving ways.

What actions can music artistes take to help end violence against women?

Most importantly, artists can commit to a life of peace themselves and contribute to the movement by their own example. Also, creating and sharing songs that promote peace can take the message further. Certainly speaking on the topic to their audiences any chance they get and recommending resources and organisations like The Pixel Project are other great actions to take.

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The “Music For Pixels 2014″ charity digital album is available from 1 April 2014 – 1 April 2015 as a companion to the “30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days” campaign. The album features a selection of 12 positive and empowering songs from the campaign by artistes including  Adam Web, AHMIR, AJ Rafael, Bob Sima, Courtney Jenae, Debbie Reifer, Delaney Gibson, Ellis, Macy Kate, Mary Sholz, Pete Ahonen, and Troy Horne

The album is the perfect and affordable gift for music lovers and for celebrating special occasions such as birthdays and Mother’s Day. It is available for download worldwide via major online music retailers including iTunes and Amazon.com. 100% of the album proceeds will benefit The Pixel Project to help keep their anti-Violence Against Women campaigns, projects, and programmes running.

bt-m4p2014-dl-amazon                   bt-m4p2014-dl-itunes

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2014 Interview 24: Matt Gregory, 40, USA

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2013! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2014 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our twenty fourth “30 For 30″ 2014 Dad is Matt Gregory from the USA.

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The Dad Bio

Matt Gregory is the Associate Dean of Students and Director of Student Advocacy & Accountability at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Matt is the current President of the Association for Student Conduct Administration (ASCA). Matt has a Bachelor’s degree in Biological Sciences from Southern Illinois University, a Master’s degree in Counseling and Student Affairs from Western Kentucky University, and a Doctorate of Philosophy in Educational Administration from Southern Illinois University. His dissertation focused on male advocacy against sexual violence of women. Matt has over 12 years of experience in higher education administration and has 6 years of law enforcement experience. Matt is a certified Rape Aggression Defense (RAD) instructor. He is the father of one son and three daughters and enjoys trying to make them laugh as often as possible.

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1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

I have come to believe that the best thing about being a dad is watching your children’s personalities and identities emerge and develop. It is astonishing to see your own positive and negative personality attributes emerge in your own children. It is equally enjoyable to experience life all over again by viewing the world around you from their perspective and without the stressors of the adult world.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

As an adult male, I have not had what is perceived as a traditional childhood upbringing. My mother and father divorced when I was 4 years old and I was raised by my mother without a male figure in the house until I was 16 years old. Much of what I learned about the treatment of women came from my mother, my female friends, and loved ones, as well as through my own observations of both positive and negative examples of male treatment of women. During my own personal male initiation into manhood journey, I never lost sight of the feminine influence on my life. Now that I have a son, I try to help him find his own maleness while maintaining a deep regard and admiration for females.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

Violence against women is very much a societal issue. Some people would argue that sexual violence against women is entirely a female problem and that men have no place in such a dialogue. Based on research on sexual violence, it has been widely held that men are by and large the perpetrators of sexual violence. Because of this, dialogue intended to stop sexual violence must involve men. It is imperative for prominent men in our schools, work, towns, states, and nation to publicly speak out and engage other men toward stopping violence against women. Further, it is absolutely essential that these men live their lives as active examples of positive maleness, demonstrating regard, respect, and admiration of women.

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2014 Interview 23: Robert de Leon Jr, 33, USA

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2013! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2014 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our twenty third “30 For 30″ 2014 Dad is  Robert de Leon Jr. from the USA.

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The Dad Bio

Robert de Leon Jr. is the founder and executive director of Bro Models, an organization that aims to engage and mobilize men in sexual assault prevention and challenges the negative aspects of traditional manhood. Bro Models was founded in October 2013 during Domestic Violence Awareness Month because the RGV was lacking a serious conversation on engaging and/or mobilizing men and boys to help prevent violence before it starts. For more information, go to www.bromodels.org.

family

1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

With the birth of each and every one of my nephews and nieces, of which they are 16, I’ve come to learn some of the expectations that come with parenting. Although I am not a father, or their father to be specific, it feels great how they see me as a father figure. My admiration for all four of my sisters and my brother in how they’re raising their kids runs deep and I like to think that they see me as a great example and role model to their children. The best part of this experience, as an uncle, is that I’ve learned that fatherhood is not something you learn; instead, it is something many of us already know. As men, we are capable and will love, nurture, and care for our children.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

Without diving too deep into the past, my father was absent for the majority of my life. If anything, learning to respect women came from the important women in my life – my mother and four sisters. Throughout the course of my life, I struggled with maintaining “healthy relationships,” which has taught me the importance of becoming a positive role model to other men and boys.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

I truly believe that men will play a crucial role in becoming part of the solution. Oftentimes we forget how important our roles as men are in the lives of our families and children growing up without fathers. There is a painful realisation that there are a lot of men out of touch with themselves because of the outdated notion of manhood, which I feel has a negative impact on fatherhood. Breaking down traditional gender roles and masculinity is a great way to get men on the same page.

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2014 Interview 22: Paulvit Nijaranond, 36, USA

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2013! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2014 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our twenty second “30 For 30″ 2014 Dad is Paulvit Nijaranond from the USA.

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The Dad Bio

Paulvit Nijaranond was born in the Bronx, New York, an only child of two loving parents who had migrated from Thailand. He graduated with a B.A. in Economics and worked jobs in various industries until he found his place within a passion driven role at a luxury automotive brand. This success was made possible through his wife’s support and his newly inspired vision as a father of his 7 month old daughter. Paulvit plans to make the most of his life and provide inspiration and support as a positive role model with his new family.

PaulvitNijaranond1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

Being a dad has given me the opportunity to make the most of myself in order to provide financial and parental support to my family. Everything I do now will reflect how my child perceives me and I will teach her to believe that she is strong and capable of anything. It’s also an unexplainable feeling to come home and have someone jump and scream for joy when they see you!

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

My father was a Thai Buddhist monk for 15 years; this is what gave him the schooling to leave behind a rural and poverty life before coming to the United States for new opportunities. He is righteous and has compassion and patience. While growing up, my dad taught me to be good to my mother, as she is the only mother I would have. My father-in-law, who no longer is with us, was one of the kindest and generous men ever. Both of my dad’s personalities gave me the direction to follow suit and treat all people with the respect, especially with women and girls.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

Awareness, communication, and leading by example are the most important ways fathers and other male role models can help young men and boys take interest. A father can raise their child to respect women, treat them the same as everyone else, and step in and take action in a confrontation, if the situation allows. Men and women, boys and girls, are the same and we need to start/continue teaching our children correctly to stop the violence against women.