Archive for June, 2014

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2014 Interview 21: Jerry Chuaypradit, 36, USA

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2013! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2014 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our twenty first “30 For 30″ 2014 Dad is Jerry Chuaypradit from the USA.

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The Dad Bio

Jerry is an engineer by day, who is gaining a passion for social business and social media, but first and foremost, he is a 24-hour-a-day father to an amazing daughter. He loves to bike and is in constant search of a hobby or an activity that his entire family can enjoy together.

jerry1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

The best part of being a father is coming home after work or school and switching over to dad mode. Regardless of the type of day I’ve been having, I can always count on big hugs and big smiles when we’re all together at the end of the day. There is no better feeling. A few minutes with my daughter quite simply heals all wounds acquired during the day.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

My father grew up in a culture of male dominance and was not the best of role models. He was able to indirectly teach me that having respect for women and girls is a basis for a strong family. I want my daughter to grow up seeing fathers who are always supportive of mothers, so I’m doing what I can to lead by example.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

It’s up to us to intervene when young men and boys are not supportive of women and girls. It’s up to us to set the right example and teach young men and boys to respect women and girls so that they can pass it on to their peers. Actions do speak louder than words and, when given the opportunity, we must be proper role models by making sure that all the women and girls in our lives know that we have their backs! The idea is to get everyone to understand that we’re all in this together and our lives are enhanced when there is mutual respect among males and females.

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2014 Interview 20: Justin Johari Azman, 34, Malaysia

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2013! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2014 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our twentieth “30 For 30″ 2014 Dad is Justin Johari Azman from Malaysia.

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The Dad Bio

Justin Johari is a legal counsel in the music industry and teaches copyright to university students on a part-time basis. His past time passion is using creative arts, such as music and film, to educate the public on issues that affect society, like the need for love, compassion, and better understanding of people with different backgrounds, faith, age, and gender. As a father, he sees the importance of a creating a better environment for his two daughters and son, as well as their whole generation, to grow up in.

With Ikhlas (TPP)1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

The best thing about being a dad is having the opportunity to shape and raise useful human beings while correcting our mistakes and flaws as adults. It gives me great satisfaction to see the prejudices, biases, and negative mind-sets we have as adults prevented or absent in my children. This comes with us correcting them or reacting to a certain incident in a manner that does not fit in the usual unhealthy preconceptions we all have as adults.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

I grew up in a large family and saw how each of the men in my family interacted with women, be it their wife, mother, siblings, or acquaintances. From there, I felt certain values were positive and differentiated them from the negative ones. I was closer to my mother growing up, so how she felt when treated in a certain way was important to me, and I experienced that first-hand as someone close to her.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

Today’s children are visually-driven and so having visual-based educational programmes run by organisations like the Media Education Foundation (www.mediaed.org), could really help in opening up dialogue with them. For example, I was fortunate to have been granted an opportunity to make a film titled Who Speaks for Me? about freedom of expression through the Arts. I toured several states in Malaysia to explain about the film and subject matter to audiences that would not otherwise have access to these ideas. I believe children can learn about the issue of violence against women through the use of these educational tools and mediums to spark their interest in the subject as well as expose them to fact-based situations where women and girls have been mistreated as a result of cultural conditioning.

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2014 Interview 19: Adam Miller, 39, USA

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2013! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2014 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our nineteenth “30 For 30″ 2014 Dad is Adam Miller from the USA.

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The Dad Bio

Adam M. Miller is the Managing Director for Theatre Tuscaloosa, a community theatre based at Shelton State Community College in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. He has an M.F.A. in Theatre Management/Arts Administration and a B.A. in Communications from The University of Alabama (UA). Adam attended public schools in San Antonio, TX, Lewisville, TX, Lake Dallas, TX, and Huntsville, AL. He met his wife, Paige, at UA, and their first son, Kai, was born in Baton Rouge, LA, while their youngest son, Quinn, was born in Alabama. He and his family currently reside in Moundville, AL.

amiller-family1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

Reunions. It’s so wonderful to be woken up with the enthusiasm that only children can bring. Picking up a child who is enthusiastic about seeing you is so rewarding and coming home from an out-of-town trip to hugs and exciting stories about what happened during your absence is an exciting time.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

My dad always put our family’s well-being first. Sometimes he worked as many as three jobs and went to school to ensure that we always had a roof over our heads and food on the table. My dad was always a faithful husband and has stayed married to my mother for 44 years, which says a lot. He shares some of the household chores with my mother, usually by doing laundry. My father always encouraged me to be a friend and protector to my two sisters and he has been a wonderful brother to my aunt and a good son to my grandmother. He always stepped in if my sisters or I spoke disrespectfully to our mother and reinforced that we should treat her with the utmost respect.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

We can help stop violence by speaking up and setting an example. So much of our society is permeated with attitudes that consciously and subconsciously relegate women to a status of second-class citizens. It’s important to set an example of choosing gender inclusive pronouns when talking about participants in every profession; treating children’s mothers with respect and demonstrating marriages as equal partnerships; speaking up about sexist comments, attitudes, and imagery that is perpetuated by society at large, both generally and specifically; and by talking about what your family’s values are when it comes to respecting girls and women. It’s important for fathers to participate in daily chores, field trips, baby care, cooking, school activities, etc. It’s important to avoid saying that a father is “babysitting” when he is caring for his own children alone. Generally, it’s important for fathers to SHOW children how to treat each other and themselves with respect.

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2014 Interview 18: Travis Wendel, 29, USA

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2013! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2014 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our eighteenth “30 For 30″ 2014 Dad is Travis Wendel from the USA.

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The Dad Bio

Travis is a 29 year old living in Pennsylvania with his wife, Leslie, and son, Frederick. He has a Bachelor’s Degree in Geography from Indiana University of Pennsylvania and works in the Oil and Gas Industry. Travis enjoys the outdoors, good food, and spending time with his friend and family. His son recently turned 3 in May and he and his wife are expecting their second child (a girl!) this August.

Travis & Frederick Wendel1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

The best thing about being a dad is watching my son grow and learn. The look of excitement and happiness on my child’s face when he accomplishes something that he feels proud of, or when we take him to do something that he absolutely loves, cannot be compared. Being a dad is an awesome responsibility. Your children depend on you to take care of them, love them, protect them, and guide them. For me, nothing gives me a greater sense of fulfillment in life than seeing my son be happy.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

I don’t recall a specific time or conversation where my dad talked to me about this topic. One thing I do remember about my childhood is that my dad always taught me to be polite and respectful to others, and to always say please and thank you. I continue to conduct myself in that manner around other people and I am trying to teach my son to be polite and respectful as well.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

Young men and boys need learn how to deal with issues and how to treat other people, but they need to learn that through good guidance from their parents or other influential figures throughout their life. I feel that fathers and male role models can get young men and boys more involved by exposing them to the realities and harmful effects of violence toward women, and lead by setting good examples. My wife and I both work full-time jobs so I personally take on more of a responsibility in our home life. I want my son to see his parents sharing responsibilities and view us as being equal, and the importance of that.

The “30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days” Interview – Ellis

As part of  The Pixel Project’s 30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days” project in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign, we talk to the artistes who have participated in the project about why they are using their music to speak out and to say NO to violence against women. 

Our twelfth featured artiste is Ellis. There’s just something about Ellis. She is at once funny and wise, thoughtful and uninhibited, and her captivating voice is matched by her uplifting lyrics. After her Feb 2013 appearance on A Prairie Home Companion, Ellis’ music charted in the Folk Top 100 in iTunes and Folk Top 20 on Amazon.com. She also received hundreds of messages from strangers including, “you exude pure joy”, “I heard you and fell in love” and “I was stopped in my tracks by your music and captivating laugh” as well as “Yours is a voice we all need to hear.” Ellis’ performances are transformational; she leaves her audiences better than she finds them, with softened edges & opened hearts.

A winner of several awards and honors, Ellis has been recognized both for her songwriting skills as well as her engaging performances. Many folk festivals have “audience choice” awards, and Ellis has claimed those honors at Falcon Ridge Folk Festival, Moab Folk Festival, and Sisters Folk Festival. She also won the Grassy Hill Kerrville New Folk Contest in 2013, the Midwest Mountain Stage New Song Contest (US) in 2011 and the award for the Just Plain Folks (International) Best Female Singer Songwriter Album in 2009.

Ellis contributed her song, “You Are Royalty To Me” to the “30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days” campaign in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate here.

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Ellis # 4- 300 dpi credit - Jake Jacobson(.jpg)Tell us about yourself and why you decided to take part in The Pixel Projects 30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days project.

I have been blessed with many strong women in my life, including my granny (the inspiration for my song), my mother, my partner and my daughter. Women are leaders, creators, and inspirations to me.  I’m excited to be a part of any project that champions the health,happiness, and safety of women.

Why is ending violence against women important to you?

I long for a world where my daughter can grow up and be seen and respected as an equal human being, safe from all objectification and abuse. A world where she can be free.

In your opinion how does music help in efforts to end violence against women?

I think music is a powerful tool. It can open people’s hearts and move them. That is how I believe all change and real connection is created; through open-heartedness.

What actions can music artistes take to help end violence against women?

I think the first step is to look at how we treat ourselves and others. Not just in our interactions, but also how we speak about others in our songs. Unfortunately we live in a culture that often treats women and girls as objects. What we need are leaders who challenge that.

 

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The “Music For Pixels 2014″ charity digital album is available from 1 April 2014 – 1 April 2015 as a companion to the “30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days” campaign. The album features a selection of 12 positive and empowering songs from the campaign by artistes including  Adam Web, AHMIR, AJ Rafael, Bob Sima, Courtney Jenae, Debbie Reifer, Delaney Gibson, Ellis, Macy Kate, Mary Sholz, Pete Ahonen, and Troy Horne

The album is the perfect and affordable gift for music lovers and for celebrating special occasions such as birthdays and Mother’s Day. It is available for download worldwide via major online music retailers including iTunes and Amazon.com. 100% of the album proceeds will benefit The Pixel Project to help keep their anti-Violence Against Women campaigns, projects, and programmes running.

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“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2014 Interview 17: Clay Goodman, 32, USA

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2013! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2014 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our seventeenth “30 For 30″ 2014 Dad is Clay Goodman from the USA.

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The Dad Bio

Clay received his Bachelor’s Degree in History from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte and his Master’s Degree in Liberal Studies from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. He joined the United States Air Force in 2004 and converted from active duty to the North Carolina Air National Guard in 2010, where he serves as Second Lieutenant, leading and managing a section of maintenance squadron to ensure that aircrafts are ready to fly. Since 2010, he has worked at Duke Energy as a supervisor for customer contact operations throughout the Southeast and Midwest. He and his wife, Candace, reside in Charlotte, North Carolina with their two young children, Cole and Mason. They are expecting their first daughter in September.

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1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

The best thing is understanding that it is my example that will directly form my children into being who they are for the rest of their lives. I often share lessons that will not only teach them to do the right things now, but will also give them the guiding principles to do the right things for the rest of their lives. I’m simply enjoying the freedom to give them a strong foundation in which they can add their own personal touch.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

I’m lucky to have a mother and sister in my life, as it has given me a dual perspective on how to treat women and girls. My father was a model to me when I was young because I could observe the manner that he treated my mom and sister, which was with the utmost respect and dignity. He taught me to appreciate what women and girls bring into our lives and the unique challenges they are faced with. He and I continue to have back-porch conversations about the challenges that families face and how we both can continue to adapt and grow to become the best people, husbands, and fathers we can be.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

First off, fathers and other male role models must lay the foundation of how to treat women. It’s also important to show the reality of violence against women. Many young men and boys don’t realise how often it occurs and the deep and long-lasting effects of violence, whether it’s physical, mental or verbal. It’s important to give young men and boys the tools to teach them how to build healthy relationships with their girlfriends or wives. These tools should include behavioural skills to help them cope more effectively with personal conflicts or situations when they feel they’ve lost control in their lives. Lastly, as fathers and male role models, we need to make it clear that using any form of violence is unacceptable under any circumstance.

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2014 Interview 16: Santanu Dam, 35, India

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2013! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2014 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our sixteenth “30 For 30″ 2014 Dad is Santanu Dam from India.

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The Dad Bio

Santanu works in a finance office working with Oxfam India and loves to travel and meet new people and see new cultures. He has been a father for almost four years and five months and life has changed ever since. Since the arrival of his son, spending time with him is the most important thing for him.

santanu dam1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

The best thing about being a dad is that I have become a better human being. I see and realise things in myself that I don’t want in my son. It’s like having another opportunity in life. It’s the best thing to have happened and with each passing day, I realise it more. I didn’t have an extreme kick start relationship with my son, as I lived in another state, but now being together for years, he has become my strength and weakness at the same time.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

I grew up in a small town in West Bengal, India to a conservative, yet very liberal, Bengali family. In a country where women are treated as objects, I’m glad I’ve had a different upbringing. My elder sister was the apple of my father’s eye and my brother and I were often jealous. For me, though, it was never learning to respect women. It was just the way we were brought up. It’s the way men in the family related to women, spoke with them, participated with them in decision making. Our house in the village was one of the different ones, where meals were equally shared and not divided between girls’ meals and boys’ meals, which would have more of the share and the best parts of the fish, chicken, or egg. I have often seen my father stand up against child marriages and dowry marriages, and women subjected to domestic violence. I was too young to understand these things but I admired him for standing up for what is right. I learned there is nothing manly in abusing women; rather its better being human beings who respect one another.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

It’s like two sides of the same coin. If one has to address any issue, it should be with both sides. And true, why should it be a women’s issue? I am a father and it’s important how I’m behaving with others because I know my son is watching. The process is not always formal. Mere insignificant things can bring about change in the mindsets of children.

Being a father of a four and a half year old, I pay special attention when he watches television or listens to Bollywood songs, where women are objectified and consciously change channels. As a dad, it’s important that we treat women the way we want our daughters or sons to be treated when they grow up. Standing up for them in whatever way one can, can leave a lasting impression on children. We should remember being born a girl is not a crime and not a gateway to be victimised or abused. These issues are not just in developing countries like India, but all over the world, and its growing and changing from day to day. Delay in our actions will only cause delay in our solutions.

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2014 Interview 15: Curtis Pollanen, 34, Canada

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2013! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2014 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our fifteenth “30 For 30″ 2014 Dad is Curtis Pollanen from Canada.

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The Dad Bio

Curtis is the Administrative Manager of The Northern Store in Moosonee, ON. He is the father to a beautiful 8-month old daughter, who is his everything. He enjoys reading, watching movies, and spending time outside with his family. Family time is very important to him and reading stories together, playing games, and sitting and singing along to music is the best part of his day.

IMG_90041. What is the best thing about being a dad?

The best thing is just spending time together and watching my daughter come into her own. Watching her grow and learn, seeing her expressions, everything with her is so rewarding. Greeting her after work and seeing her smile is simply amazing.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

My grandfather was more of an influence in my life. His “old school” way of showing respect for women is not seen too often. Showing the respect, love, laughter, and everything in between makes life worth living. Being able to make a woman smile, laugh, and love you is something. By showing women their worth and earning their love and respect is one of life’s best gifts.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

The best way to step up is to get involved early on. By showing young men the proper respect for all women, it will carry on for a lifetime. By giving compliments, being respectful and courteous, you can be an everyday prince of sorts. Being surrounded by this environment continuously showcases respect at all times, not just when “the mood is right.” Men must also not be afraid to speak up. Many women do not feel that they have anyone to speak up for them, so be that person that makes the difference in their lives. If everyone were to respect women on the same and proper level, the world would be that much better.

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2014 Interview 14: Martin Copeland, 30, USA

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2013! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2014 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our fourteenth “30 For 30″ 2014 Dad is Martin Copeland from the USA.

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The Dad Bio

Martin is the husband to Siobhan and father to Jaxon, who is four months old. His other roles fall behind those. He has been told that he has been a dad for years because he works and volunteers in youth work as a teacher, college access advisor, youth leader, and mentor for young men in the DMV area (DC, Maryland, Virginia) for over 10 years. He waves his nerd flag proudly and is the type of comic book fan who scoffs at the pseudo fans who only know about X-Men and The Avengers because of the movies.

Martin Copeland1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

The best thing about being a dad so far is enjoying the day-to-day growth and changes of my son. It feels like he does something different every day. I get so excited when he smiles, laughs, rolls onto his side, or responds to people.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

Growing up, my father was very clear about how I was to conduct myself with women as a man. My father is a gentleman and I learned to emulate him at an early age. I learned social etiquette towards women from him. My father demanded that I respect women, starting with my mother and twin sister. This was non-negotiable in my house.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

Fathers and other male role models must actually model appropriate behaviour for the young men in their lives. Young men have to see examples of men who not only respect women but acknowledge the injustices against women in this world. Boys will not grow up as advocates unless they see that their fathers don’t distance themselves from women’s issues. My son, Jaxon, will know that the more subtle harmful and offensive microaggressions are just as wrong and unacceptable as hitting a woman.

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2014 Interview 13: Daniel Blake, 71, USA

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2013! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2014 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our thirteenth “30 For 30″ 2014 Dad is Daniel Blake from the USA.

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The Dad Bio

Daniel currently lives in California, having recently moved following his wife’s retirement. He worked for Crown Zellerbach Corporation for 29 years, followed by 12 years with CityTeam Ministries. Daniel has been married to his wife and best friend for 45 years and, together they have one daughter, Carrie, and two grandchildren, Justice and Tredan.

Blake

1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

The Lord has changed me over the years in my thoughts, attitudes, actions, and words towards my daughter and grandchildren. Although it has not always been easy, it has been very rewarding. I love spending time and interacting with them. I have come to appreciate and celebrate their diverse personalities, and I have learned to relax and enjoy my family.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

My father’s influence was both negative and positive. He wasn’t the most sensitive and caring husband or father and he held the belief that women were subservient, which I carried into my marriage and fathering style. I was lucky because I had other influences. My next door neighbour for many years spoke often of the high value that Jesus placed on women, and my uncle showed the value of womanhood in how he treated his wife with love and respect.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

By reading and attending seminars, I was able to change my perspective and treatment in both attitude and actions in regards to my sensitivity and responses towards women. Now I show through my interactions with my wife, daughter, and granddaughter that I value them as women, showing them respect and honour. Men must step up to the plate and be models in their actions and words. Fathers need to “walk the walk” before their sons and daughters. It is important to affirm our convictions when called upon to do so publicly.