Archive for June, 2014

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2014 Interview 12: Scott Murphy, 37, USA

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2013! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2014 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our twelfth “30 For 30″ 2014 Dad is Scott Murphy from the USA.

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The Dad Bio

Scott recently graduated medical school and is entering psychiatry residency. He is especially interested in helping people experiencing difficult life paths, such as abused women. Scott and his fiancée are both survivors of psychologically abuse relationships and they both hope to use this experience to treat each other well and help others. They will be marrying this month. He is the father of twin sons, as well as the stepfather to a daughter and a pair of boy/girl twins.

scott murphy21. What is the best thing about being a dad?

It’s the really obvious stuff, like getting to see them grow up and be their own smart, creative people, and watching them make good decisions.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

Where I live in Eastern Kentucky, most men behave well within the paradigm of being the boss, using women, etc. The difference for me was, honestly, my mother. Because my father was often absent due to his work, I became very close to her and appreciated what she did for us. I also tried to help her as much as I could. I had always been a gentle type of boy, and boys like me were treated very badly where I grew up. I ended up hanging out with the women in my family more than men, such as at family reunions, so that I didn’t get teased about not loving cars or sports.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

I think that kids learn by example and you’ve got to set one by not saying or doing violent things towards anyone. You have to have no tolerance of bullying people of any kind. In our house, we spend time talking about the importance of not making anyone an “other” for any reason. We discuss women’s rights, gay rights, transgender rights, third world rights, and so on. It’s important that children see themselves as a part of the greater world community, instead of occupying some special status. The minute you see yourself as better and separate, things such as violence happen. We are raising our sons and daughters to have empathy for all people and making sure that they understand the violence women experience worldwide so that they can prevent it in their lives and the lives of others.

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2014 Interview 11: Hasman Farid Mohd Ali Noh, 39, Malaysia

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2013! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2014 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our eleventh “30 For 30″ 2014 Dad is Hasman Farid Mohd Ali Noh from Malaysia.

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The Dad Bio

Hasman Farid is a happily married dad of three children, aged thirteen, eight, and three. He has worked in the financial industry for the past 15 years in both Malaysia and Singapore. There was a period during his working life when he was seconded to a subsidiary company in Singapore while his family was in Kuala Lumpur and he travelled every weekend to be with his family for a period of three-and-a-half years. Those were one of the toughest times for him as his work required him to be at one place while his family was far away.

Hasman Farid

1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

I never really thought of being a dad as being in command of the household but as a person who is responsible for every aspect of my children’s well-being, knowledge, education, ensuring that they have respect for others and many other characters, as well as moulding them into good individuals to the family and society. As I have children in various stages of childhood, among the best thing about being a dad is to be their friend when they need me, to be their mentor helping them work through their problems, and to support their interests in order to reach their potential.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

My attitude towards women and girls are directly related to the way my father treats my mother. In my life, I have never once seen my father scold my mother or expect my mother to attend to his needs and fancies. Although he is the man of the house, my father cooks for the family, helps with the household chores, taught my sister and I to recite the Quran, and was always there whenever we needed him. Even after 48 years of marriage, at the age of 76, my father still holds my mother’s hand while crossing the road. And when they go out, he still opens the car door for her and cooks for her.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

In my opinion, men who treat women violently are the most cowardly human beings. They have degraded themselves, although many men who have done this feel they are superior and strong. As a Muslim, contrary to the popular belief that in Islam the men have a higher standing than women, the Prophet Muhammad was the kindest human to his wives, children, and women. In fact, in a hadith, he mentioned that the best people among men are those who are the most kind to their wives. I believe the education starts from home, where children will pick up on the behaviour of men towards women in the household.

The “30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days” Interview – Ellen Bukstel

As part of  The Pixel Projects 30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days project in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign, we talk to the artistes who have participated in the project about why they are using their music to speak out and to say NO to violence against women. 

Our eleventh featured artiste is Ellen Bukstel. Hailed by Pop Star and Social Activist Michael Bolton as “An Amazing Artist And Spirit,” Ellen Bukstel challenges her listeners to laugh, dig deep and embrace the wild emotional rollercoaster we call life with every daring turn of phrase…a rare, bold, real deal maverick, a multi-faceted break the mold original who lays her emotions bare, puts her passions on the line and, without fear, makes the world perk up and pay attention with straight talking, heart on her sleeve, from her soul to yours lyrics.. From hilariously funny to moving compositions of love, remembrance, and social awareness, her songs always hit home. She has been recognised with 14 international fundraising awards for her music videos with songs that have collectively have helped to raise close to a hundred million dollars for community causes such as Housing the Homeless, Human Rights, Helping people with Alzheimers and Children with Wide Spectrum Autism and Raising Awareness about Domestic Violence.

Ellen contributed her song, “You’re Not Better Than Me” to the “30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days” campaign in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate here.

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Ellen BukstelTell us about yourself and why you decided to take part in The Pixel Project’s “30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days” project.

Back in 2005, there was no other issue captured my attention more, at that time, than the tragedy and proliferation of domestic violence (DV) in my community and the country and world.  I was fired up and raring to take on the world and so, to arrest and calm my frustration, I wrote my song – an anti-domestic violence called “You’re Not Better Than Me,” and through several DV organisations it has helped to raise hundred of thousands of dollars for DV outreach and education.

I have been speaking and singing AGAINST domestic violence and FOR empowerment of women for many years and I was delighted, through 30/30/30 , to have the opportunity to share my song with women who might be comforted or empowered by the music and lyrics and the intention of my song.

All of the artistes in 30/30/30 have made a commitment to speaking out and that is what music does. It crosses all boundries of race, skin color, religious and spiritual beliefs and socio-economics. We are all PEOPLE who deserve respect and to be safe in the world.

Why is ending violence against women important to you?

Knowing that violent acts and injustices happen to women all around the world makes it everyone’s responsibility to speak out. By being silent we give our consent! Speaking out, or in my case “singing out” is my personal way of helping to educate and to change laws that will make perpetrators accountable and demand protection of women’s rights by enforcing those laws.

In your opinion how does music help in efforts to end violence against women?

Music and songs have historically been a unifying force amidst the sometimes turbulent movements of social change. They have had a universal way of bringing awareness about many things. They have shaped our world. The Pixel Project’s 30/30/30 project recognises the commitment of singer-songwriters who are trying to positively influence our culture with their fearless social activism and unwavering commitment to peace and positive change

Music is my way of speaking out against the oppression and injustice. We live in a male dominated world with cultures that, for generations, have perpetuated violent customs and crimes against women. Education and protective laws are important to foster changing attitudes towards women. The more we teach our children at a young age to respect life and family and one another, the more we foster independence and positive self esteem as they grow into adults.

What actions can music artists take to help end violence against women?

If I could do ONE thing through my song to help, I would say to every women that they are “beautiful” and “vital” and “intelligent” and to say to anyone and everyone who tries to minimise their worth: ”You’re Not Better Than Me!”

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The “Music For Pixels 2014″ charity digital album is available from 1 April 2014 – 1 April 2015 as a companion to the “30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days” campaign. The album features a selection of 12 positive and empowering songs from the campaign by artistes including  Adam Web, AHMIR, AJ Rafael, Bob Sima, Courtney Jenae, Debbie Reifer, Delaney Gibson, Ellis, Macy Kate, Mary Sholz, Pete Ahonen, and Troy Horne

The album is the perfect and affordable gift for music lovers and for celebrating special occasions such as birthdays and Mother’s Day. It is available for download worldwide via major online music retailers including iTunes and Amazon.com. 100% of the album proceeds will benefit The Pixel Project to help keep their anti-Violence Against Women campaigns, projects, and programmes running.

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“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2014 Interview 10: Casey Thompson, 31, Canada

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2013! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2014 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our tenth “30 For 30″ 2014 Dad is Casey Thompson from Canada.

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The Dad Bio

Casey is a secondary physical education teacher, as well as the coach for the hockey, football, and softball teams at his school. He has been married to his wife, Stacey, for four years this August and has two children – Max, 2 years old, and Mikayla, 7 weeks old. Casey spends his free time backcountry camping and canoeing with family and friends.

Casey

1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

The best thing about being a dad is the love that you receive from your children. When my son greets me at the door when I get home and screams, “Daddy!” my heart melts. When my infant daughter looks deeply into my eyes and gives me a small smile, it also warms my heart. Seeing the huge smile on my son’s face the first time he got to ride some of the rides at the fair was very fulfilling for my wife and me. Fatherhood also brings my wife and me together more. It has strengthened our bond and enhanced our love by filling our home with little giggles and smiles.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

My father was absent in my life until I was 20 and, even to this day, I’m not particularly close with him. My mother was the one who raised me and always stressed the importance of treating both genders with the upmost respect. Her strength and determination helped show me how women can do whatever is necessary to provide for their children. Her constant love and guidance has helped me become a man with good family values and a loving family. I learn all of that from the guidance of my mom.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

I think it’s all about respect. Fathers and other male role models need to always show respect and talk openly about respecting women. They must teach that violence is wrong in all situations. Avoiding stereotypes is also very important. A few comments by a male role model can really affect a young male’s view on a subject. When it comes down to it, if you teach and show respect for women, your son will, too.

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2014 Interview 9: Cedrick Belzile, 29, Canada

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2013! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2014 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our ninth “30 For 30″ 2014 Dad is Cedrick Belzile from Canada.

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The Dad Bio

Cedrick is a 29 year old Carpenter living in Sudbury, Ontario with his wife and son. He works as a hockey referee and enjoys playing golf, hockey, fishing, and camping with his family. Cedrick met his wife while in trade school in 2006 and had their son in 20 October 2011; they married shortly after in June 2013. They both work full-time and are trying to expand their family.

Cedrick

1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

The best thing about being a dad is the unconditional love that I have for him. Waking up in the morning and seeing him is just amazing and the best part of my day. The way a kid sees things make you appreciate life and all the little things so much more. They always look at you as a role model and learn so much from you.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

My father showed me how to respect women through the way he treated my mom. He never put her down or talked negatively about her, and he never made it seem like women were anything less than men. He promoted equality and was always polite and respectful. I try to be the same kind of role model with my son, always being respectful to his mother, in hopes that he will learn to do the same.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

Besides being positive role models for young men and boys, men need to be more active in the community, especially organisations that target violence against women, and encourage their sons to participate. They need to ensure that they educate their children on how to treat and respect women. Men also need to expose their sons to the types of violence that takes place in the world, which would hopefully empower them to take a stand in stopping that violence.

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2014 Interview 8: Leland Cheung, 36, USA

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2013! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2014 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our eighth “30 For 30″ 2014 Dad is Leland Cheung from the USA.

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The Dad Bio

Leland has been a city councillor in Cambridge, Massachusetts since 2009 and is currently running for Lieutenant Governor. Between serving as a councillor and campaigning, he is also a new dad. He and his wife, Yin, have one daughter, Lela Marie, who was born in November 2013. In those rare moments that he has spare time, Leland likes to put his technical skills to work by building electric scooters by hand.

LelandCheung

1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

The best thing about being a dad is coming home from a long day at work and seeing Lela’s beaming smile rush up to me as I walk through the door. I spend a significant amount of time travelling to various cities throughout Massachusetts, so I truly relish those quieter moments where it is just my family and me together. Lela is growing up so fast, so every moment spent with her is precious.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

I have nothing but tremendous respect for my father. As a Chinese immigrant to the United States, he took a huge chance at making a better life for his family. He was drawn to America for its unique combination of freedom and opportunity for all, including women. I credit him for instilling in me that passion to help forge stronger communities for everyone and to help make Massachusetts a better place for everyone, regardless of gender.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

Dads and community role models need to step up and break the cycle of silence in regards to violence against women. For too long, this issue has not been discussed openly, but attitudes are changing. It is every man’s duty to speak out and let young men know that violence against women is unacceptable in any circumstances, and that intentionally hurting women is a characteristic of a weak man.

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2014 Interview 7: John Tuinema, 27, Canada

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2013! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2014 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our seventh “30 For 30″ 2014 Dad is John Tuinema from Canada.

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The Dad Bio

John Tuinema is a single dad and former paramedic. He is currently in medical school and lives in Sudbury, Ontario with his wonderful son, Gavin.

John Tuinema1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

I know that my parents were the biggest influences in getting me to where I am happy with my life, where I am, and what I’ve accomplished. The fact that I can give my son the same love and support my parents gave me is an amazing feeling. It can be terrifying because it is an immense responsibility, but one that I take on gladly.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

My dad did the most important thing he could do to influence my attitudes and actions towards women: he led by example. If, for some reason, I picked up a sexist idea or attitude from school or peers, he was quick to point out the flaws in those thoughts and guide me away from them. He treated my mother and all the women in his life with respect. He ensured my mother was an equal partner in family and career decisions, and actively encouraged her in everything she did.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

This isn’t the first time the roles of men have been acknowledged in ending violence against women. Many men grew up hearing, “You should never hit a woman.” The problem with that approach is that it comes from a “pick on someone your own size” mindset, which doesn’t acknowledge that women are just as strong as men. Instead, dads need to teach their sons, “You never hit anyone,” while simultaneously guiding them towards gender equality, breaking down gender roles and stereotypes, and teaching that it is okay for a man to be a feminist. Let women lead the way on this massive societal problem, but teach our sons to ensure they aren’t making things worse by reinforcing gender roles and stereotypes in their efforts to help.

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2014 Interview 6: Colin D’Silva, 48, India and Singapore

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2013! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2014 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our sixth “30 For 30″ 2014 Dad is Colin D’Silva from India and Singapore.

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The Dad Bio

Colin has a doctorate in Biochemistry/Microbiology and has been working in the cosmetics industry for over 16 years. He worked in retail beauty for most of his career, and is now working in the prestige/luxury beauty industry. In his spare time, Colin loves to do day trips with his wife and daughter. He loves travelling and cooking. He also plays tennis and works out at the gym to stay fit and healthy.

Colin

1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

I do not have any sons, but one of the best things about being a father to a daughter is how you transform from an ordinary man to being a hero. My daughter’s eyes light up for me, and that is a joy I can’t explain. I thoroughly enjoy the activities we do together and the special bond we share. I’m a very ‘hands-on’ dad  and I delight in the fact that there is no aspect of my daughter’s care that I cannot independently handle.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

I always saw my dad being respectful and more importantly being equal to my mum and in his treatment of my sisters and brothers. He never shied away from domestic work, and if anything was one of the finest cooks I knew. I have learned to be meticulous, keep a good home, develop a love for cooking and enjoy home life from him. In a traditional patriarchal society like India where I grew up, this in itself is a big step forward. Today, my immediate family life includes my wife, daughter and my mum who is my dependent although she doesn’t live with me.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

Violence against women and children is certainly a human rights issue, and one that is driven by power. It is most important that boys see their fathers as men who do not have double standards. Men need to understand and accept that manhood is not about being macho. Patience, kindness, home life balance, and equality in the home are part of what the father needs to instill in the family and live out himself. Fathers and male role models must be vocal about condemning violence against women. They must encourage all boys & men to do the same and not turn a blind eye to this issue.

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2014 Interview 5: Eric Kistemaker, 33, Canada

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2013! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2014 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our fifth “30 For 30″ 2014 Dad is Eric Kistemaker from Canada.

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The Dad Bio

Eric is currently a part-time fire-fighter, and has held jobs as an electrical apprentice and train conductor to help his wife through school, where she is studying to be a physician. In 2012, Eric took a year off for paternity leave after the birth of his son.

Eric Kistemaker

1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

This is almost an impossible question to answer. I am not sure that I could decide on one thing. There are many things I enjoy about being a father including having someone look up to you, watching the joy your child sees in the world, and the fact that I can be a role model and help shape a person into becoming something hopefully better than myself. Having a little buddy is also a great benefit of being a dad.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

My father was not around, as my parents split up when I was young. Being raised by my mother taught me respect for women. As far back as I can remember I have never considered that women were not equal. It seemed to me that women were just as capable as I was because I never saw anything else in my home environment.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

I believe that education is important in making boys understand the inequalities that women face. By teaching children how others are impacted by the differences in the world, hopefully they will be empowered to break down those barriers for women and all those facing inequalities. It is important to teach children that violence towards anyone, especially when coming from a position of power, is wrong.

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2014 Interview 4: Steve Goodman, 56, USA

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2013! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2014 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our fourth “30 For 30″ 2014 Dad is Steve Goodman from the USA.

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The Dad Bio

Steve is the Employee Relations executive for multiple business segments at Bank of America. Based in Charlotte, North Carolina, he leads a team of employee relations professionals responsible for providing counsel to managers and employees in order to manage employment risk and help the company deliver on its operating principle of being a great place to work. Steve also serves on the Board of Directors of Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Charlotte. He and his wife, Annette, reside in Charlotte. They have two grown children, Clay and Christine, and four grandchildren.

Steve Goodman with wife and grandsons

1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

Sharing experiences with them – good and bad – and letting them know that I’m beside them every step of the way. As my children have grown, I’ve seen them apply many of the stories and life lessons my wife and I shared with them over the years, and develop into wonderful, responsible adults. I’m now seeing them use many of those same life lessons to help their own children learn and grow.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

I was fortunate to have a father who treated women with great respect in all situations, both publically and privately. He had grown up as the only boy in a family with four children. He enjoyed wonderful loving relationships with all of his three sisters. He appreciated their individual strengths and took great joy in their successes. I believe that his behaviour was learned from watching his father treat his mother and sisters with respect. One of the important lessons I learned from my father was that mean or abusive language can be as damaging as physical actions. He chose his words carefully, even during disagreements, and never used language that left others feeling demeaned or inadequate.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

First and foremost, fathers and other males need to model appropriate behaviour for young men and boys to emulate. Second, they need to proactively create opportunities to speak to young men and boys in a candid and direct way about the importance of healthy and respectful relationships. This can occur during organised events, small group discussions, and one-on-one personal conversations. Frequently, the most impactful interventions occur when men observe other men behaving inappropriately in what may be perceived as a “safe” environment, perhaps behind closed doors at work or over a beer at the local bar, by using demeaning, sexist language or sharing stories about girlfriends and wives, which could demonstrate their desire to seek greater control in the relationship or even the intent to cause harm to that person. These types of intervention opportunities require that the observer demonstrate the personal courage to speak up in the moment to let the offender know that their comments or actions will not be tolerated. In extreme cases, the observer must reach out to law enforcement to intervene.