Catalina

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“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015: Interview 17 – Luke K., 35, USA

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2015 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our seventeenth “30 For 30″ 2015 Dad is Luke K. from the USA.

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The Dad Bio

I’m a pilot in the military, I play guitar and I’m a dad to an adorable little 1-year-old girl. My daughter is spunky and hilarious and, as someone very accurately described her, willful. She makes me smile every single day and absolutely completes our family. I can’t wait to see what kind of person she grows up to be. I’ll love her no matter what, but if I had my choice, she’d be a kickass rock star. 

1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

I want to say the best thing is to come through the door at the end of the day and my daughter has this big smile on her face and she crawls at lightning speed toward me. You can’t beat that. But on a deeper level, the best thing about being a dad is watching my daughter grow up before my eyes and realising you can have a positive impact on her life. I love helping her learn new things—little things like how to turn on a light switch, play catch with a ball, stick her tongue out, or identify where her nose is. The look of excitement when she gets it – being a part of that is amazing.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

My dad taught me that you treat others with respect. It was just automatic. I could see it in how he treated my mom and my sister—he was always very caring and loving, and he’d talk them up all the time.

He was in the military, and when he’d come home from a three- or six-month long deployment, he would say how proud he was of my mom, being able to take care of the household. He would always say how smart my sister was. Subconsciously, I know I picked up on that. You can build women up with words.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

If I have a son someday, I’ll teach him that women are strong. This notion that you can say, “You throw like a girl” or doing something “like a girl” has a negative connotation—that’s just incorrect. Those kinds of statements promote the idea that men are superior to women, and I don’t support that.

It’s also teaching boys to have courage when they’re in very male-dominated situations when men tend to talk about women like objects, like sports teams or the military. It’s teaching boys to have the courage to stand up and offer a different opinion, to change the direction of the conversation rather than just going along with what everyone is saying. 

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015: Interview 14 – Craig Wilkinson, 51, South Africa

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2015 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our fourteenth “30 For 30″ 2015 Dad is Craig Wilkinson from South Africa.

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The Dad Bio

Craig Wilkinson lives in Cape Town with his wife and 2 children, Luke (21) and Blythe (18). He is a TEDx speaker and author of the book, “DAD – The Power and Beauty of Authentic Fatherhood” which he wrote after receiving a letter from his 18 year old son thanking him for all he had done and meant to him as a father. Craig runs a non-profit organisation called Father A Nation (FAN) and gives keynote talks and workshops on masculinity and fatherhood. He can be contacted at craig@fatheranation.co.za or through his website www.craigwilkinson.co.za  The DAD Book can be reviewed at http://bit.ly/DADBook or ordered online at http://goo.gl/tTSqJ4 . Craig’s TEDx Cape Town talk can be viewed at http://goo.gl/fUFQCJ.

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1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

There are so many wonderful things about being a dad.  Becoming a father birthed in me a love that I had never before experienced.  It showed me what unconditional love means and gave me a greater sense of meaning and purpose than I had ever known before.  Without doubt my children have been the single biggest inspiration for me to live right.  Watching them grow and thrive and become whole, free thinking, loving adults has been the greatest joy of my life.

Being a dad has made me a far better man. Knowing that two wonderful human beings look to you as the most important man in their world is all the motivation I need to be the best I can be for them.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

I agree with the statement that a father is his son’s and daughter’s first role model.  What he does with this great privilege plays a huge role in how his son will treat women and what kind of behaviour his daughter will accept from men.

As with any man my father had a big influence on my life, some good and some not so good. And like every man needs to, I had to learn to take on the good and deal with the wounds caused by the bad.  One of the good things my dad modelled was his loyalty and commitment to his wife and family and I’m very grateful for that.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

The first and most important thing that fathers and role models need to do is demonstrate by their lives the value of women and how to treat them with honour and respect.  To do this well every man needs to look in the mirror and deal with any wounds he has to his masculine soul and any misconceptions he has about true masculinity.

Secondly he needs to teach younger men in words and actions how to be a gentleman and treat women. Real men use their strength to love, serve, protect and provide, never to abuse or dominate or take what is not his to take.  This is a message that men need to give to the younger generation by what they say and what they do.

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015: Interview 13 – Mike Reynolds, 36, Canada

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2015 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our thirteenth “30 For 30″ 2015 Dad is Mike Reynolds from Canada.

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The Dad Bio

I’m an Ottawa born-and-raised husband and father of two who’s mildly obsessed with making sure my daughters never learn to colour inside the lines and with making sure they know they’re both one-of-a-kind. I’m always learning and always writing about the experiences I go through as a parent and about how eye-opening it is to watch a child grow up in this world. I also write bedtime stories with my daughters and share stories about the trials and tribulations of raising two girls after growing up in a house full of boys at puzzlingposts.com.

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1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

Watching how easy it is for your children to make an impact on the world, from little things like picking up litter outside their school because they “don’t want to hurt the earth,” to them going to talk to a crying friend who’s nervous about being at school. It’s amazing to see the things they create, to see them learn new things, to have them read to you for the first time. Watching your own child grow is an invaluable gift.

I’m also an incredibly big fan of snuggles. I’ll always welcome snuggles no matter what time of day.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

The biggest thing my dad taught me was to do what was right even if doing what was right wasn’t the most advantageous to me. He’s the kind of man who would tell a cashier if they forgot to charge him for a bag of chocolates. He also taught me that being a parent isn’t always easy. That there are early hockey practices to drive to, that there will be wounds to get stitched up, and that you’ll play the villain many times when raising a child, and that that’s not a bad thing.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

I think there are hundreds or thousands, probably millions of ways, but a key one is simply treating women like humans. It’s so damn simple. Do this all the time and challenge yourself to not only be respectful but to call out people who aren’t, even if it means being the “party pooper” who calls out misogynistic jokes at the bar. It will be uncomfortable to do the first few times as your buddies tell you it was just a joke and to lighten up, but these simply aren’t subjects to joke about and sexism isn’t something to lighten up about.

There are microagressions everywhere, and you’ll discover yourself using quite a few of them, like I have. Don’t defend your use of them – get rid of them altogether. Don’t get upset when a women tells you they’re uncomfortable with something you’ve said. Listen to them, believe them and learn from it. Telling children that everyone is equal isn’t enough. Treat people that way when kids are around and when they aren’t.

It’s also important that you don’t reinforce archaic gender stereotypes. Moms and dads both clean. Moms and dads both cook. Moms and dads both read bedtime stories. Be active in every aspect of your child’s life.

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015: Interview 12 – Mugisho Ndabuli, 46, Rwanda and Democratic Republic of Congo

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2014 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our twelfth “30 For 30″ 2015 Dad is Mugisho Theophile Ndabuli from Rwanda and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

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The Dad Bio

I am Mugisho Ndabuli Théophile. I was born in DR Congo in 1969. Now I live in Rwanda.  My wife Bahati is also from DR Congo; we have three children - two daughters and a son. We had our first child in 2007. I teach English and courses related to peace, conflicts, and violence at University. I am also doing a PhD in Gender and Development. I am passionate about women and children’s rights; in 2009 I cofounded COFAPRI (www.cofapri.org) to help rural women and children who are victims of rape and domestic violence in DR Congo. Our family often travels to DR Congo to visit family and for work.

Mugisho Ndabuli

1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

Being a father gives me internal peace and more pride. As my wife and I spent more than six years childless, I can better understand and appreciate what being a dad really means. When my children call me Daddy, I feel happy. I also share my full pride at being a dad with the mother of my children and my full respect also goes to her.

Being a dad gives me more responsibilities as children cause me to consider my actions a lot more as I have observed that my children follow my lead in a positive way and take me as their role model in life.

Being a dad also affects my work with COFAPRI in a positive way as being a dad helps me better understand the needs of the children COFAPRI serves in my country –  rural children born of rape who not only lack fatherly moral and material support but also suffer discrimination because they never knew their own fathers.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

My father has truly been a role model in my life in different ways. He was a community leader who committed his life to protecting women and children and he taught me how to respect and value women and children, at home and in the community. I became motivated about women, girls, and children because of the family environment in which I grew up. Dad, Mum, and Grandma have positively shaped and influenced my attitudes and beliefs toward women and children.

My father died in 2000, some months before I got married and I have carried into my heart and implemented his precious advice by cofounding COFAPRI. Inglenook used to tell us ‘he who does not value his mother, his wife, or his sister dies like a dog.’  The world without women is meaningless, hopeless, and colourless; women create harmony between human beings and the ecosystem. Thanks to women, men become what they are; women feed and educate children who are the pillars of the future society. Women take care of the elders and the sick in communities; we could fail to do this correctly. Such beliefs shaped my valuing of women and children.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

The abuse of women is not a women’s issue but everyone’s concern. Women are human beings yet abuses against them are committed as women are considered as second class people – people without rights.

Young boys and men often behave the way of their fathers and teachers. Therefore fathers who are respectful to and supportive of women and girls will foster their sons’ love toward women. Through home basic education, the boys can internalise respect for women, which can bear positive results in the future.

This informal home education can be supported by schools and the government can play a role by enacting and strictly enforcing laws that value women. This can open a way to preventing violence to women and hope for a future where women enjoy their rights.

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015: Interview 11 – Dana Williams, 72, USA

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2015 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our eleventh “30 For 30″ 2015 Dad is Dana Williams from the USA.

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The Dad Bio

I was born in San Antonio, Texas. My father was in the military and my two brothers and I grew up mostly in France and England. I joined the Navy when I was 17 and was a jet mechanic. I’m retired from the U.S. Civil Service after 32 years. I worked many jobs but mostly was an industrial engineer while in the service. After I retired I worked as a truck driver to make ends meet. I rode motorcycles when I was well enough; I even had a baby seat attached to the back of one of my Harley’s. I have four daughters and one son.

DanaWilliams_Cropped1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

I cannot imagine not having my kids around – I would be so lonely in this world. The best thing now that I’m old is that I can count on them, and know I always can.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

It was always really clear to me that men were not supposed to be violent towards women. My father would not have allowed it.

He never allowed my brothers or me to talk back to our mama. None of us had to talk about it, it was just expected that we respected our mother the way our daddy respected her.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

Don’t just say your beliefs but live them. Hypocrisy is not the path of true men. Also, ensure your children respect their mother and expect them to do what’s right.

 

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015: Interview 10 – Chester Chan, 36, UK

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2015 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our tenth “30 For 30″ 2015 Dad is Chester Chan from the United Kingdom.

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The Dad Bio

My name is Chester Chan and I am Dad to Alfie and Annie who are 7 and 5 respectively. I work as a dentist in the county of Wiltshire and I live in Surrey. My hobbies include gardening and cooking. I am involved with my kids’ school activities, especially with the events which are held throughout the year.

1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

Apart from the challenges of being a dad, the children bring happiness and satisfaction when they are happy and progressing well with the things they do. I have a long drive each day so rarely see the kids in the morning unless they wake up before I leave for work at 6.30am. I get back in time for bath and story time which is the best time of the day as we have a good chat about the day. We go swimming at the weekend and during the winter Alfie plays rugby on Sundays.

Cuddles and chats are the best as you learn a lot about what they are doing and what they are learning day by day. When you see your children are happy, thriving and learning to be respectful young people, you definitely feel satisfaction and a great sense of pride.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

Respect and a positive attitude towards women and girls comes from both parents as well as day-to-day education. My father was more ‘old school’ and I learnt more from my mother. Some of his mistakes have been the greatest lesson in teaching me about respecting women and other people.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

The most important lesson to pass on to children is to set a good example and teach respect in everything. This will lead to a well-rounded person who understands the world and how to be a good person.

 

 

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015: Interview 9 – Sean Wang, 28, China

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2015 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our ninth “30 For 30″ 2015 Dad is Sean Wang from China.

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The Dad Bio

My name is Sean and my wife Jing and I are currently running an online toy shop called SJ Toys Zone. I am a father of one son and one daughter, and as both Jing and I have no relatives or family members here in Australia, so our small family means a lot to us. Sometimes juggling between business and family can be quite challenging, but I still enjoy it. After a long day’s work, seeing both kids running to me when I get home is the best thing ever.

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1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

I think the best thing being a dad is being successful in building and growing my own small family. To see my kids growing up -from birth to first steps to seeing them pick up their first word – and being part of their life’s journey is an amazing experience.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

My dad has always treated my mum with respect, that’s for sure. I have never seen my dad used any violence against my mum, so this sort of thing was never in my environment while I was growing up so it was never an issue in our family.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

I think in most cases violence against women happens within marriage, so I will talk about domestic violence. Trying to prevent the violence won’t be easy – we have to find the root problems and fix it. Digging deeper to solve the root issue is important, and learning how to love and how to build up a marriage is a life-long journey that needs attention and is definitely worth the effort.

In general, I believe that just saying “stop being violent against women” is not good enough to stop domestic violence. As husbands, we should love our wives and be willing to sacrifice for them, like Christ for the church. Love is patient and kind. With sufficient love, we will have more patience to communicate better, and this is very important in preventing us from taking extreme actions during relationship conflicts.

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015: Interview 8 – Ray Reyes, 38, USA

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2015 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our eighth “30 For 30″ 2015 Dad is  Ray Reyes from the USA.

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The Dad Bio

I am a member of the United States Air Force as a Client Systems Technician/Project Manager.  I am currently stationed in Okinawa, Japan with my 2 kids, Trysten and Sophia, and my wife Christie.  My oldest daughter, Ella, is a freshman in Arizona State University as a Business major and is part of their competitive Cheerleading squad.  I love to travel and see the world and also DJ when time permits. It’s been a passion of mine for 18 years now.  Most importantly, I get to share these memorable moments and experiences with my family which will last a lifetime.     

trysten_sophia1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

The best thing about being a dad is knowing what it means to love something or someone more than yourself.  The feeling I had when I saw my children for the first time is something I could never replicate with anyone.

Being a father has humbled me throughout the years. They make you want to be a better man because as a father, you want them to have a role model and a mentor who will guide them as they grow up.  I want them to be able to say that “my dad was always there for us”.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

I have never really had that single positive influence growing up.  My father was always gone due  to his job so he was never around.  I guess I could say that the biggest role model to me is not  just one person but a combination of people I’ve looked up to including my peers, grandfather, uncles and cousins.  They’ve taught me – not through words but through their actions – about how they  treat women.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

Young men and boys usually emulate their role models.  If these male role models set a good example on how to treat women with respect, it will most likely prevent violence.  We can never completely stop the violence but if fathers and role models get involved in our children’s development and awareness during their early years, we can get them to take interest in helping to stop violence against women.

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015: Interview 7 – Harry Wu, 27, Australia

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2015 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our seventh “30 For 30″ 2015 Dad is Harry Wu from Australia.

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The Dad Bio

My name is Harry Wu and I am from Melbourne, Australia. My daughter was born in January this year. Her name is Zoey Wu and she is our first child. It has been the most wonderful experience so far as a dad. During the day I work as an auditor for the State Government and after I come home from work, I am a full-time dad. No matter how my day went, Zoey’s smile always makes everything better. 

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1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

“Changing diapers!”, says no one ever…

I think the best part of being a dad is really about growing with your child. It is extremely rewarding seeing your child grow, especially during those early days. They seem to change every single day. Each day as they grow, as a parent myself, I grow too. I have learnt to become more patient. This is especially true when my daughter cries for no reason and I am not able to soothe her. My time management skills have improved as well. You also become a more caring person in general because you always think about what’s best for your kid and this increased caring will also manifest in your attitude towards others.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

My father has been a really good role model and a good influence over how I treat women. Since I was young My dad has always been very respectful of my mother. He has always showed his caring side especially when my mum needs him.

I still remember the one time my mum had a surgery and was staying in the hospital. My dad only finishes work late at night and still wanted to visit her, even though it was way past the visiting hour. We still went to the hospital and begged the security to let us in.

My dad doesn’t have the best temper in the world and we all know it’s common to have disagreements between husband and wife. Even then, he would never be violent or abusive and they would find their own ways to solve any conflicts respectfully.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

Awareness is a key factor in ensuring our young men and boys understand the implications and the role they play in stopping violence against women. Childhood is a good time to reinforce these positive actions as their ability to understand other people’s experiences and feelings begin developing at this young tender age. I believe that as parents we are the ultimate role models for our children. Take my father as an example: he has often reminded me to ‘be nice’ to my mum but those words would be meaningless if he did not lead by example.

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015: Interview 6 – Christopher Johnson, 43, United States

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2015 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our sixth “30 For 30″ 2015 Dad is Christopher Johnson from the USA.

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The Dad Bio

I live in Las Vegas Nevada with my wife and 3 children. I have a 17-year old son – Westin, and 2 daughters – Abbie – 13, and Emma – 10. I am in the technology field and serve as Chief Operating Officer of 2 technology companies that are based here in the valley. We have 2 dogs, a snake, a turtle, and a fish. I enjoy spending time with my family on weekends and spending good leisure time in and around our house and neighbourhood.

Family-2013_cropped1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

Feeling like you make a difference! I feel like every conversation, every action, every lesson is something that is absorbed by my children and leaves an impression. With that comes stress as well, but I think it is so amazing and inspiring to leave a lasting impression on someone.

One of the biggest highs I get is feeling that after I am gone, my kids will reflect different elements of my time with them in their lives as they live on. It is a powerful feeling to know you have impacted a child in a positive manner.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

My father and my mother divorced when I was around 2 years old, but one memory that lasted with me was that he always referred to her in a very positive light and said that she was amazing. This type of acknowledgement of a woman’s importance and guidance was very impactful to me and led to my overall perception of how a woman should be treated.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

It sounds simplistic, but open candid conversation with your children is critical. When children are little, they fight. This is common among all nationalities. I think it is important when kids get to their juvenile years that we enforce the importance of never physically or mentally abusing a woman. I really feel like we emphasise it when we discuss the day’s events or a particular topic around someone being mistreated. It is certainly not something that we shy away from discussing as a family and in a very open and direct manner.