30 For 30 Father’s Day Campaign

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015: Interview 20 – Samuel Leadismo, 30, Kenya

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2015 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our twentieth “30 For 30″ 2015 Dad is Samuel Leadismo from Kenya.

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The Dad Bio

My name is Samuel Siriria Leadismo. I’m the Founder and Director of Pastoralist Child Foundation whose mission is to eradicate Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) and forced childhood marriages of girls in the Samburu and Maasai communities in Kenya. We sponsor girls who attend private secondary boarding schools. I’m originally from Samburu County, Kenya, from the Samburu tribe, Black Cattle clan. The Samburu tribe is nomadic – moving from one place to another with their livestock searching for greener pastures. I’m a role model, advisor, and counsellor in our villages, always encouraging my fellow youth to continue their education. I’m working against early marriages and Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) by actively promoting childhood and adult education amongst my community members.  I attained a higher Diploma in Hospitality and Tourism Management from Zetech University. I’m a proud dad of a 4 year old daughter. 

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1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

One of the things I love most about being a dad is watching my child put to use the lessons that I’ve taught her. I feel so proud of my daughter when she does the little things without anyone telling her to do them – things such as helping clean up the house at the age of four, or just saying ‘please’ and ‘thank you.’ When that happens, and I don’t have to tell her, I know she has learned that lesson for life.  She can make me cry when I have to go out of town for work.

My favourite thing about being a father is that I can work hard every day to leave this world a better place for my daughter and the community I work with.  Being a dad softens my heart, and makes me instantly more accountable and responsible to the world around me.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

My dad is a polygamist and lived far from us, so it was my mother who influenced my life the most through kindness, compassion, integrity, calmness even in the face of extreme challenges, passion for life, humour, and unconditional love. During my mother’s last year, she asked me to guide and educate my younger sisters, and to fight for the right of all girls to enjoy the opportunities she didn’t have. I am proud of myself, our community, and the work we do through The Pastoralist Child Foundation.

Two other women have also influenced my life. One is Blake Valin, an American woman living in West Palm Beach Gardens, Florida. I met her when she visited Kenya in 2005. She taught me how to be patient, understanding, and to fight for what I believe in. She paid all my high school and university fees, and helped my family. She taught me to never give up!

The other is Sayydah Garrett, the Founder and President of Pastoralist Child Foundation, who gave me the confidence to found our Pastoralist Child Foundation. We sponsor girls in high school, and offer community workshops to end FGM and child marriages.  We teach about teen pregnancy, HIV/AIDS, self-awareness, self-esteem, sexual and reproductive health, gender-based violence, sanitation, and the importance of formal education here in Kenya.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

I believe men and boys can play a role in preventing and stopping violence against women. Men can join women and girls in challenging violence and oppression globally and help create a place where people of different backgrounds, lifestyles, and communities can learn and feel safe by listening and caring for each other.

Some of the ways in which they can do this include connecting with other men and boys about their experiences with violence and with privilege and coming together with an agreement of honesty and respect by putting aside fears, and creating a culture where we practice understanding rather than winning, communication rather than fighting, sharing rather than defending.

I really love working towards ending violence against women because women changed my life by educating me, raising me and believing in me.  I hope many men can take this message to another level so that they can see the necessity of ending violence against women. I’m doing this through my charity work and am seeing progress as men in my community are moved by my ideas about ending violence.

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015: Interview 19 – Peter Rock, 47, USA

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2015 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our nineteenth “30 For 30″ 2015 Dad is Peter Rock from the USA.

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The Dad Bio

Peter Rock was born and raised in Salt Lake City, and now he lives in Portland, Oregon, with his wife and two fierce young daughters, Ida (8) and Miki (6).  The author of six novels, most recently The Shelter Cycle and My Abandonment, and a story collection, The Unsettling, he has several works forthcoming, including the novel Klickitat and his novel-within-photographs, Spells.  He is also a professor, teaching fiction and non-fiction writing in the English Department at Reed College.

1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

Watching the girls learn (e.g. How to read… and getting lost in books – amazing!). Also watching them wonder, hearing their questions—the way they apprehend the world, without the clutter of too much opinion and experience is an inspiration.

There are so many best things:  another one is just how bewildering and impossible it is, how I am always a little out of my depth, trying to figure out what is the right thing to do with them, to tell them—this relentless challenge is at once terrifying and vivifying.

And I just like the simple, instinctual way they reach out to hold my hand when we’re walking together.  Like that is a natural thing to do.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

My father has always been devoted to my mother—sometimes embarrassingly so—and in that way served as an example of how to be in a long-term relationship.  He also coached soccer throughout my childhood, perhaps most notably for my sisters’ teams, and his advocacy for and interest in women’s sports was something I learned from.  Simply watching how his expectations of my sisters—in sports, academics, life—were no different than those he held for me and my brother:  that informed me.

Also, he was and is a huge proponent of daydreaming.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

I think this is a matter of being an example, but also being quick to question situations that are violent or tinged with violence or sexism.  This goes for situations out in the world, but also in terms of storytelling (as a person who writes and teacher of writing, I have many opportunities to raise these questions).

For me, it’s also a matter of demonstrating that being a person involves respecting all genders and identities, listening to them, to try not to be defensive or insecure.  I’m also married to a doctor who works long hours, so I tend to do the majority of the cooking and much childcare. So I believe that fluidity in “traditional gender roles” has also been an important learning experience for me, and a way in which I can advocate for similarities as opposed to differences.

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015: Interview 18 – Matt Hellman, 41, USA

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2015 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our eighteenth “30 For 30″ 2015 Dad is Matt Hellman from the USA.

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The Dad Bio

Matt Hellman has been an attorney for 15 years, having previously worked for the Ohio Attorney General’s Office and the U.S. Department of Justice. He is now the Executive Director of New Directions, the Domestic Abuse Shelter and Rape Crisis Center of Knox County, Ohio (http://newdirectionsshelter.org/). Along with his wife, Jill, who is the Director of Residential Life and Assistant Dean at Kenyon College in Gambier, Ohio, he is the parent to three young children: a daughter (12), son (8), and daughter (4). They also have a dog who thinks that she is the fourth child. 

1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

Bedtime stories, hearing the same joke many times over, family-night movies, zoo trips, Christmas morning, catching fireflies, lost teeth, artwork on the refrigerator, calming thunderstorm fears, smiley-face pancakes, leaf-pile jumping, snowman building. Being a dad, or a mom, is one of the hardest things someone can do, but it can also be the most rewarding.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

My father and mother have been married for over 40 years. Having been married for over 15 years, I can appreciate what that means; the good, fun, and happy times are sometimes intermixed with low points that are tough and sad. But my father, along with my mother, was willing to work through those challenges because they valued each other and the family unit.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

It is not enough for fathers and other men to simply not commit violence against women. Instead, one must look to the model being urged on college campuses of active bystanders. We need to use our knowledge, influence, and positions to ensure that we work to stop the violence that is being committed as well as advocate for the prevention of future violence so that persons of all genders, sexual orientations, races, religions, and socioeconomic statuses can lead violence-free lives.

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015: Interview 17 – Luke K., 35, USA

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2015 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our seventeenth “30 For 30″ 2015 Dad is Luke K. from the USA.

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The Dad Bio

I’m a pilot in the military, I play guitar and I’m a dad to an adorable little 1-year-old girl. My daughter is spunky and hilarious and, as someone very accurately described her, willful. She makes me smile every single day and absolutely completes our family. I can’t wait to see what kind of person she grows up to be. I’ll love her no matter what, but if I had my choice, she’d be a kickass rock star. 

1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

I want to say the best thing is to come through the door at the end of the day and my daughter has this big smile on her face and she crawls at lightning speed toward me. You can’t beat that. But on a deeper level, the best thing about being a dad is watching my daughter grow up before my eyes and realising you can have a positive impact on her life. I love helping her learn new things—little things like how to turn on a light switch, play catch with a ball, stick her tongue out, or identify where her nose is. The look of excitement when she gets it – being a part of that is amazing.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

My dad taught me that you treat others with respect. It was just automatic. I could see it in how he treated my mom and my sister—he was always very caring and loving, and he’d talk them up all the time.

He was in the military, and when he’d come home from a three- or six-month long deployment, he would say how proud he was of my mom, being able to take care of the household. He would always say how smart my sister was. Subconsciously, I know I picked up on that. You can build women up with words.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

If I have a son someday, I’ll teach him that women are strong. This notion that you can say, “You throw like a girl” or doing something “like a girl” has a negative connotation—that’s just incorrect. Those kinds of statements promote the idea that men are superior to women, and I don’t support that.

It’s also teaching boys to have courage when they’re in very male-dominated situations when men tend to talk about women like objects, like sports teams or the military. It’s teaching boys to have the courage to stand up and offer a different opinion, to change the direction of the conversation rather than just going along with what everyone is saying. 

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015: Interview 16 – Nick Salvadore, 35, USA

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2015 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our sixteenth “30 For 30″ 2015 Dad, courtesy of our partner Name.com, is Nick Salvadore from the USA.

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The Dad Bio

My name is Nick Salvadore. I’m a software engineer at Name.com, where I’ve worked for the past three and a half years. I enjoy watching baseball, eating cookies, and slowly fixing up our 90 year-old house that we have owned for nine months. The majority of my free time is spent playing with my son and daughter; usually wrestling in the living room or kicking around a ball in the back yard.

1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

The best thing about being a dad is coming home to two smiling kids who are almost jumping out of their skin because they are so happy to see me.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

I inherited my dad’s introverted personality, which probably explains why I ended up as a software engineer. I’ve spent the majority of my life intimidated to talk to anybody, especially women. I think the big impact my father had on my views of women was watching him interact with my mom. He was always very respectful and occasionally would surprise her with little things or with gestures that showed he cared. Like all married couples, they would argue occasionally, but there was never any name calling and both would let the other fully voice their opinions and views.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

I think the best method is to simply lead by example. It can be little gestures like opening car doors for their mothers or holding open a door at the store for a woman who has her arms full. It’s always amazed me how one small event can have a giant impact if it occurs at the right moment.

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015: Interview 15 – Michael Glavanis, 34, Egypt

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2015 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our fifteenth “30 For 30″ 2015 Dad is Michael Glavanis from Egypt.

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The Dad Bio

I divide my life into two parts: before Adam and after Adam. Before he was born in 2014 I used to plan my life around going to play football, the next time I could go scuba diving, seeing friends, or my work as a High School Social Studies teacher. After Adam, things like that weren’t as important. Though I only have one child, he has completely changed my life, and I like that.

Michael Glavanis1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

My wife and I decided to try for a child but we were rather nervous about how things would end up. Would we resent not being able to do the things we loved? It turns out the things my son does are the things I love.

Though I am not as good as my wife at devoting time to him, I love watching him, spending time with him, and, most importantly, watching the world through his eyes — the look of curiosity and wonder on his face as he see new things, his laugh, his smile, and the way he holds on to me. What more could I ask for?

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

The way the question is worded presupposes that my father may have treated women and girls differently than men or boys. Through his words and actions, my dad raised me to treat all people as equals. It didn’t matter what your gender was, you were treated the same and viewed through the same lens of expectation. My sister, who is much younger than me, is afforded the same treatment as my brother and me.

Looking back, I guess his attitude of equality stemmed from my grandmother as a role model. She was a strong matriarch for the family who showed by example that women were just as capable as men and worthy of the same treatment.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

A long time ago, a female friend living in Egypt was grabbed from behind by some young boys. Instinctively she swung her bag at them, hitting one. The next day the boy’s mothers approached my friend in the street and asked for an explanation. Once the story was told, one mother said, “They were only boys.”

This message shows that men’s roles are learnt in the home. Parents raise their children through actions that show their sons and daughters the right ways to act. Lessons learnt in the home are the ones that last the longest. It is there that men can show by example how we are all equal.

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015: Interview 14 – Craig Wilkinson, 51, South Africa

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2015 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our fourteenth “30 For 30″ 2015 Dad is Craig Wilkinson from South Africa.

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The Dad Bio

Craig Wilkinson lives in Cape Town with his wife and 2 children, Luke (21) and Blythe (18). He is a TEDx speaker and author of the book, “DAD – The Power and Beauty of Authentic Fatherhood” which he wrote after receiving a letter from his 18 year old son thanking him for all he had done and meant to him as a father. Craig runs a non-profit organisation called Father A Nation (FAN) and gives keynote talks and workshops on masculinity and fatherhood. He can be contacted at craig@fatheranation.co.za or through his website www.craigwilkinson.co.za  The DAD Book can be reviewed at http://bit.ly/DADBook or ordered online at http://goo.gl/tTSqJ4 . Craig’s TEDx Cape Town talk can be viewed at http://goo.gl/fUFQCJ.

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1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

There are so many wonderful things about being a dad.  Becoming a father birthed in me a love that I had never before experienced.  It showed me what unconditional love means and gave me a greater sense of meaning and purpose than I had ever known before.  Without doubt my children have been the single biggest inspiration for me to live right.  Watching them grow and thrive and become whole, free thinking, loving adults has been the greatest joy of my life.

Being a dad has made me a far better man. Knowing that two wonderful human beings look to you as the most important man in their world is all the motivation I need to be the best I can be for them.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

I agree with the statement that a father is his son’s and daughter’s first role model.  What he does with this great privilege plays a huge role in how his son will treat women and what kind of behaviour his daughter will accept from men.

As with any man my father had a big influence on my life, some good and some not so good. And like every man needs to, I had to learn to take on the good and deal with the wounds caused by the bad.  One of the good things my dad modelled was his loyalty and commitment to his wife and family and I’m very grateful for that.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

The first and most important thing that fathers and role models need to do is demonstrate by their lives the value of women and how to treat them with honour and respect.  To do this well every man needs to look in the mirror and deal with any wounds he has to his masculine soul and any misconceptions he has about true masculinity.

Secondly he needs to teach younger men in words and actions how to be a gentleman and treat women. Real men use their strength to love, serve, protect and provide, never to abuse or dominate or take what is not his to take.  This is a message that men need to give to the younger generation by what they say and what they do.

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015: Interview 13 – Mike Reynolds, 36, Canada

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2015 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our thirteenth “30 For 30″ 2015 Dad is Mike Reynolds from Canada.

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The Dad Bio

I’m an Ottawa born-and-raised husband and father of two who’s mildly obsessed with making sure my daughters never learn to colour inside the lines and with making sure they know they’re both one-of-a-kind. I’m always learning and always writing about the experiences I go through as a parent and about how eye-opening it is to watch a child grow up in this world. I also write bedtime stories with my daughters and share stories about the trials and tribulations of raising two girls after growing up in a house full of boys at puzzlingposts.com.

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1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

Watching how easy it is for your children to make an impact on the world, from little things like picking up litter outside their school because they “don’t want to hurt the earth,” to them going to talk to a crying friend who’s nervous about being at school. It’s amazing to see the things they create, to see them learn new things, to have them read to you for the first time. Watching your own child grow is an invaluable gift.

I’m also an incredibly big fan of snuggles. I’ll always welcome snuggles no matter what time of day.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

The biggest thing my dad taught me was to do what was right even if doing what was right wasn’t the most advantageous to me. He’s the kind of man who would tell a cashier if they forgot to charge him for a bag of chocolates. He also taught me that being a parent isn’t always easy. That there are early hockey practices to drive to, that there will be wounds to get stitched up, and that you’ll play the villain many times when raising a child, and that that’s not a bad thing.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

I think there are hundreds or thousands, probably millions of ways, but a key one is simply treating women like humans. It’s so damn simple. Do this all the time and challenge yourself to not only be respectful but to call out people who aren’t, even if it means being the “party pooper” who calls out misogynistic jokes at the bar. It will be uncomfortable to do the first few times as your buddies tell you it was just a joke and to lighten up, but these simply aren’t subjects to joke about and sexism isn’t something to lighten up about.

There are microagressions everywhere, and you’ll discover yourself using quite a few of them, like I have. Don’t defend your use of them – get rid of them altogether. Don’t get upset when a women tells you they’re uncomfortable with something you’ve said. Listen to them, believe them and learn from it. Telling children that everyone is equal isn’t enough. Treat people that way when kids are around and when they aren’t.

It’s also important that you don’t reinforce archaic gender stereotypes. Moms and dads both clean. Moms and dads both cook. Moms and dads both read bedtime stories. Be active in every aspect of your child’s life.

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015: Interview 12 – Mugisho Ndabuli, 46, Rwanda and Democratic Republic of Congo

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2014 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our twelfth “30 For 30″ 2015 Dad is Mugisho Theophile Ndabuli from Rwanda and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

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The Dad Bio

I am Mugisho Ndabuli Théophile. I was born in DR Congo in 1969. Now I live in Rwanda.  My wife Bahati is also from DR Congo; we have three children - two daughters and a son. We had our first child in 2007. I teach English and courses related to peace, conflicts, and violence at University. I am also doing a PhD in Gender and Development. I am passionate about women and children’s rights; in 2009 I cofounded COFAPRI (www.cofapri.org) to help rural women and children who are victims of rape and domestic violence in DR Congo. Our family often travels to DR Congo to visit family and for work.

Mugisho Ndabuli

1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

Being a father gives me internal peace and more pride. As my wife and I spent more than six years childless, I can better understand and appreciate what being a dad really means. When my children call me Daddy, I feel happy. I also share my full pride at being a dad with the mother of my children and my full respect also goes to her.

Being a dad gives me more responsibilities as children cause me to consider my actions a lot more as I have observed that my children follow my lead in a positive way and take me as their role model in life.

Being a dad also affects my work with COFAPRI in a positive way as being a dad helps me better understand the needs of the children COFAPRI serves in my country –  rural children born of rape who not only lack fatherly moral and material support but also suffer discrimination because they never knew their own fathers.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

My father has truly been a role model in my life in different ways. He was a community leader who committed his life to protecting women and children and he taught me how to respect and value women and children, at home and in the community. I became motivated about women, girls, and children because of the family environment in which I grew up. Dad, Mum, and Grandma have positively shaped and influenced my attitudes and beliefs toward women and children.

My father died in 2000, some months before I got married and I have carried into my heart and implemented his precious advice by cofounding COFAPRI. Inglenook used to tell us ‘he who does not value his mother, his wife, or his sister dies like a dog.’  The world without women is meaningless, hopeless, and colourless; women create harmony between human beings and the ecosystem. Thanks to women, men become what they are; women feed and educate children who are the pillars of the future society. Women take care of the elders and the sick in communities; we could fail to do this correctly. Such beliefs shaped my valuing of women and children.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

The abuse of women is not a women’s issue but everyone’s concern. Women are human beings yet abuses against them are committed as women are considered as second class people – people without rights.

Young boys and men often behave the way of their fathers and teachers. Therefore fathers who are respectful to and supportive of women and girls will foster their sons’ love toward women. Through home basic education, the boys can internalise respect for women, which can bear positive results in the future.

This informal home education can be supported by schools and the government can play a role by enacting and strictly enforcing laws that value women. This can open a way to preventing violence to women and hope for a future where women enjoy their rights.

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015: Interview 11 – Dana Williams, 72, USA

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2015 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our eleventh “30 For 30″ 2015 Dad is Dana Williams from the USA.

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The Dad Bio

I was born in San Antonio, Texas. My father was in the military and my two brothers and I grew up mostly in France and England. I joined the Navy when I was 17 and was a jet mechanic. I’m retired from the U.S. Civil Service after 32 years. I worked many jobs but mostly was an industrial engineer while in the service. After I retired I worked as a truck driver to make ends meet. I rode motorcycles when I was well enough; I even had a baby seat attached to the back of one of my Harley’s. I have four daughters and one son.

DanaWilliams_Cropped1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

I cannot imagine not having my kids around – I would be so lonely in this world. The best thing now that I’m old is that I can count on them, and know I always can.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

It was always really clear to me that men were not supposed to be violent towards women. My father would not have allowed it.

He never allowed my brothers or me to talk back to our mama. None of us had to talk about it, it was just expected that we respected our mother the way our daddy respected her.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

Don’t just say your beliefs but live them. Hypocrisy is not the path of true men. Also, ensure your children respect their mother and expect them to do what’s right.