Posts tagged Father’s Day

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015: Interview 10 – Chester Chan, 36, UK

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2015 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our tenth “30 For 30″ 2015 Dad is Chester Chan from the United Kingdom.

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The Dad Bio

My name is Chester Chan and I am Dad to Alfie and Annie who are 7 and 5 respectively. I work as a dentist in the county of Wiltshire and I live in Surrey. My hobbies include gardening and cooking. I am involved with my kids’ school activities, especially with the events which are held throughout the year.

1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

Apart from the challenges of being a dad, the children bring happiness and satisfaction when they are happy and progressing well with the things they do. I have a long drive each day so rarely see the kids in the morning unless they wake up before I leave for work at 6.30am. I get back in time for bath and story time which is the best time of the day as we have a good chat about the day. We go swimming at the weekend and during the winter Alfie plays rugby on Sundays.

Cuddles and chats are the best as you learn a lot about what they are doing and what they are learning day by day. When you see your children are happy, thriving and learning to be respectful young people, you definitely feel satisfaction and a great sense of pride.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

Respect and a positive attitude towards women and girls comes from both parents as well as day-to-day education. My father was more ‘old school’ and I learnt more from my mother. Some of his mistakes have been the greatest lesson in teaching me about respecting women and other people.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

The most important lesson to pass on to children is to set a good example and teach respect in everything. This will lead to a well-rounded person who understands the world and how to be a good person.

 

 

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015: Interview 9 – Sean Wang, 28, China

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2015 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our ninth “30 For 30″ 2015 Dad is Sean Wang from China.

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The Dad Bio

My name is Sean and my wife Jing and I are currently running an online toy shop called SJ Toys Zone. I am a father of one son and one daughter, and as both Jing and I have no relatives or family members here in Australia, so our small family means a lot to us. Sometimes juggling between business and family can be quite challenging, but I still enjoy it. After a long day’s work, seeing both kids running to me when I get home is the best thing ever.

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1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

I think the best thing being a dad is being successful in building and growing my own small family. To see my kids growing up -from birth to first steps to seeing them pick up their first word – and being part of their life’s journey is an amazing experience.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

My dad has always treated my mum with respect, that’s for sure. I have never seen my dad used any violence against my mum, so this sort of thing was never in my environment while I was growing up so it was never an issue in our family.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

I think in most cases violence against women happens within marriage, so I will talk about domestic violence. Trying to prevent the violence won’t be easy – we have to find the root problems and fix it. Digging deeper to solve the root issue is important, and learning how to love and how to build up a marriage is a life-long journey that needs attention and is definitely worth the effort.

In general, I believe that just saying “stop being violent against women” is not good enough to stop domestic violence. As husbands, we should love our wives and be willing to sacrifice for them, like Christ for the church. Love is patient and kind. With sufficient love, we will have more patience to communicate better, and this is very important in preventing us from taking extreme actions during relationship conflicts.

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015: Interview 8 – Ray Reyes, 38, USA

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2015 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our eighth “30 For 30″ 2015 Dad is  Ray Reyes from the USA.

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The Dad Bio

I am a member of the United States Air Force as a Client Systems Technician/Project Manager.  I am currently stationed in Okinawa, Japan with my 2 kids, Trysten and Sophia, and my wife Christie.  My oldest daughter, Ella, is a freshman in Arizona State University as a Business major and is part of their competitive Cheerleading squad.  I love to travel and see the world and also DJ when time permits. It’s been a passion of mine for 18 years now.  Most importantly, I get to share these memorable moments and experiences with my family which will last a lifetime.     

trysten_sophia1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

The best thing about being a dad is knowing what it means to love something or someone more than yourself.  The feeling I had when I saw my children for the first time is something I could never replicate with anyone.

Being a father has humbled me throughout the years. They make you want to be a better man because as a father, you want them to have a role model and a mentor who will guide them as they grow up.  I want them to be able to say that “my dad was always there for us”.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

I have never really had that single positive influence growing up.  My father was always gone due  to his job so he was never around.  I guess I could say that the biggest role model to me is not  just one person but a combination of people I’ve looked up to including my peers, grandfather, uncles and cousins.  They’ve taught me – not through words but through their actions – about how they  treat women.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

Young men and boys usually emulate their role models.  If these male role models set a good example on how to treat women with respect, it will most likely prevent violence.  We can never completely stop the violence but if fathers and role models get involved in our children’s development and awareness during their early years, we can get them to take interest in helping to stop violence against women.

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015: Interview 7 – Harry Wu, 27, Australia

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2015 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our seventh “30 For 30″ 2015 Dad is Harry Wu from Australia.

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The Dad Bio

My name is Harry Wu and I am from Melbourne, Australia. My daughter was born in January this year. Her name is Zoey Wu and she is our first child. It has been the most wonderful experience so far as a dad. During the day I work as an auditor for the State Government and after I come home from work, I am a full-time dad. No matter how my day went, Zoey’s smile always makes everything better. 

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1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

“Changing diapers!”, says no one ever…

I think the best part of being a dad is really about growing with your child. It is extremely rewarding seeing your child grow, especially during those early days. They seem to change every single day. Each day as they grow, as a parent myself, I grow too. I have learnt to become more patient. This is especially true when my daughter cries for no reason and I am not able to soothe her. My time management skills have improved as well. You also become a more caring person in general because you always think about what’s best for your kid and this increased caring will also manifest in your attitude towards others.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

My father has been a really good role model and a good influence over how I treat women. Since I was young My dad has always been very respectful of my mother. He has always showed his caring side especially when my mum needs him.

I still remember the one time my mum had a surgery and was staying in the hospital. My dad only finishes work late at night and still wanted to visit her, even though it was way past the visiting hour. We still went to the hospital and begged the security to let us in.

My dad doesn’t have the best temper in the world and we all know it’s common to have disagreements between husband and wife. Even then, he would never be violent or abusive and they would find their own ways to solve any conflicts respectfully.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

Awareness is a key factor in ensuring our young men and boys understand the implications and the role they play in stopping violence against women. Childhood is a good time to reinforce these positive actions as their ability to understand other people’s experiences and feelings begin developing at this young tender age. I believe that as parents we are the ultimate role models for our children. Take my father as an example: he has often reminded me to ‘be nice’ to my mum but those words would be meaningless if he did not lead by example.

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015: Interview 6 – Christopher Johnson, 43, United States

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2015 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our sixth “30 For 30″ 2015 Dad is Christopher Johnson from the USA.

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The Dad Bio

I live in Las Vegas Nevada with my wife and 3 children. I have a 17-year old son – Westin, and 2 daughters – Abbie – 13, and Emma – 10. I am in the technology field and serve as Chief Operating Officer of 2 technology companies that are based here in the valley. We have 2 dogs, a snake, a turtle, and a fish. I enjoy spending time with my family on weekends and spending good leisure time in and around our house and neighbourhood.

Family-2013_cropped1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

Feeling like you make a difference! I feel like every conversation, every action, every lesson is something that is absorbed by my children and leaves an impression. With that comes stress as well, but I think it is so amazing and inspiring to leave a lasting impression on someone.

One of the biggest highs I get is feeling that after I am gone, my kids will reflect different elements of my time with them in their lives as they live on. It is a powerful feeling to know you have impacted a child in a positive manner.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

My father and my mother divorced when I was around 2 years old, but one memory that lasted with me was that he always referred to her in a very positive light and said that she was amazing. This type of acknowledgement of a woman’s importance and guidance was very impactful to me and led to my overall perception of how a woman should be treated.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

It sounds simplistic, but open candid conversation with your children is critical. When children are little, they fight. This is common among all nationalities. I think it is important when kids get to their juvenile years that we enforce the importance of never physically or mentally abusing a woman. I really feel like we emphasise it when we discuss the day’s events or a particular topic around someone being mistreated. It is certainly not something that we shy away from discussing as a family and in a very open and direct manner.

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015: Interview 5 – Eoin Loughrey, 31, UK

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2015 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our fifth “30 For 30″ 2015 Dad is Eoin Loughrey from the UK.

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The Dad Bio

I am a proud first time Dad to my baby daughter, Iris. She is three months old and she is great. I love football and I can’t wait to take her for a kickabout at the park when she is older. I am an animator working in the games industry, currently working on a PS4 game. I am Irish but have been living in the UK for ten years. I live in the Midlands with my wife, our daughter and our two cats.

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1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

The amount of love you feel for your child. The first time they smile at you is incredible. It also adds a new dimension to your relationship with your partner. You have a new respect for each other and it’s interesting to see how well you can work together as a team.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

My parents have an equal partnership and treat each other with respect and that has influenced how I treat people. I’m finding it hard to give specific examples for this question but my parents have always made decisions together and they split work around the house fairly.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

I think men need to not remain silent if someone is, for example, talking in a derogatory way about women.

Men also need to lead by example and get involved: They can set a good example to their children by doing their share of domestic chores. They can encourage their children to play games and build interests in things that are not traditionally assigned to their gender.

Violence against women can only be stopped if everyone takes the issue seriously.

 

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015: Interview 4 – Steve Drew, 45, USA

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2014 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our fourth “30 For 30″ 2015 Dad is Steve Drew from the USA.

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The Dad Bio

Steve Drew is a business executive in the energy industry – focused on electricity and technology.  He is married to an Ecuadorian and the father of two well-travelled and balanced international kids. During free time, he volunteers to lead moderation of some of the largest speculative fiction and book-related sites on the web.  

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1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

It’s the ability to share adventures every day, to rediscover life and what makes life so rewarding by helping a young girl and boy develop through experiences.  It has been so much fun and so rewarding to help direct energy, discover answers to questions, and to experience the world together.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

My parents were unusual in that my dad’s background is in sales and my mom is a high-powered PhD. His daily influence was that women are truly equals in life. A rugged, sometimes gruff outdoors kind of gent who treated my mother and other women with an unusual level of equality.  Definitely unusual for his generation in the US.

Through him, I learned that this was a preferable way to approach life and that views other than equality were to be adjusted and, where appropriate, confronted.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

This is all about education and building on experiences at home.  Both my son and daughter are being raised in a balanced way – to respect rights of other people and to fight for what is right in life.

Violence against women is real and most definitely is not a “women’s issue” – even though it is women who are more often impacted by violence.  My kids know that it is their responsibility at school or play to take care of others when situations of bullying or violence or unkind behaviour arise.  To recognise situations and either intervene and/or reach out to the right people to help out.  To act as role models on how people should treat other people.

It’s been fun and rewarding to see them take action when action is needed.

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015: Interview 3 – Leonard Storm Warren, 45, USA

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2015 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our third “30 For 30″ 2015 Dad is Leonard Storm Warren from the USA.

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The Dad Bio

I have a total of 5 children – 2 of which are adults now, a teenager who is 15, and 2 small children residing in the home with me. For years, I was a touring musical artist from 1998, till around 2012. When I had my last child (my son), I decided that it was time to become a totally dedicated father, and husband. Leaving the music life was one of the most difficult decisions that I’d ever had to make, but oh so worth it in terms of family value! I took up photography and videography. This allowed me to fill that void of needing to be an artist. To this day, my children and wife are very pleased with me,  they look up to me more now than ever before, and I in turn, try to be the best father and husband that I can be! 

1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

The best thing about being a dad is how valuable I am to my children. They learn most of their first things with me and I get to experience so many first accomplishments with them too.  As a Dad, I get to teach fundamentals that will assist my children as they learn to walk, then walk through life on their own, and they in turn pass these lessons down to their children too. When I hear my children calling me “Dad”, when I see the love that they have for me in their eyes, I know that I am their hero, and that means more to me than ANY amount of fame or money that I could ever possess. I thank God that I am healthy, I am happy, and I am in love… with my children.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

My father was pretty young when I was conceived. I remember him being there as much as he could. Mother and him were not married; they were just children themselves. I spent quite a few years with my father (away from mother). My dad was always a hardworking man. He always treated his woman like a queen. He had very low tolerance for playing around in school and disrespect at home. These are traits I adopted and passed on to my children as I began having a family.

The role never ends though, and as you get older, the situations change, like the times. The issues that a dad faces three years ago with this child, will be very different from the way a dad needs to deal with this same issue from his child this year. There is no manual to rearing a child. You gotta get in there and try to make the very best decisions for them – ones that will be fair, concise and intelligent.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

I believe fathers and older men can do this by showing young boys, young fathers, and young men that they don’t have to play the role of being overtly “Hard”. Society has bogged us down with the ideology that you must be HARD all the time.

I have heard so many people tell young people to say ‘please’, or ‘thank you’, and the kids act like it is a really difficult thing to say. I mean really? And music, media, all things around us seem to have a campaign to glorify the Bad Boy image. I truly believe that these things are really hurting our young men too. We are conditioning our children that it is wrong to outward and compassionate emotion, and to me that is wrong.

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015: Interview 2 – Jamie Rishikof, 40, Canada and the USA

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2015 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our second “30 For 30″ 2015 Dad is Jamie Rishikof from Canada and the USA.

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The Dad Bio

Jamie Rishikof is a clinical psychologist in private practice in the suburbs of Boston. He has owned and operated his own practice since 2006. He specialises in working with kids, teens, and parents. Jamie married Dianne (nee Scheinberg) in 2004. He became a dad in 2008 with the birth of his son, Carter, who was followed 3 years later by a daughter, Madison. Connecting with kids is an essential part of Jamie’s life and passion, and he brings that sensibility to his parenting. His children challenge him to be a better parent, and provide him with irreplaceable moments of sheer joy and wonder.

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1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

The best thing about being a dad is the mixture of emotions that comes from watching them each evolving into the person that they become. I have deeply loved them at each stage of development. In some ways, each is still the same person that they were a few years ago, with defining traits continuing and elaborating; but they are each also so different than they were just a couple of months ago, with a more distinct sense of personality. I can look back at that evolution and see a path from who they were to who they are. Yet, at the same time, they continue to surprise me. I love it as both of them continue to shake up my expectations of them. I find them to be continually charming, funny, and interesting people. While I carry some responsibility for trying to raise them well, I know so much more of that comes from their own nature, and so I feel quite fortunate and grateful.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

My father and I have a pretty solid relationship. We share a lot of sensibilities and traits, and I know a lot of my best and worst traits echo from him. In many ways we walk similar paths, as we wrestle with similar demons and strive toward similar ideals. My parents have a pretty impressive marriage. When I was growing up, I did not understand that, because that was normal for me. But I see now that my mother was pretty outspoken and assertive for a woman of her generation. The fact that my father married her and respected her as much as he does says a lot about his treatment of women. The fact that I have such high regard for the outspoken and assertive women in my life (including the one that my wife and I are raising) says a lot about what I learned from him about gender dynamics.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

First off, in my opinion, violence against women is primarily a male issue, since it is primarily a problem of male violent behavior.

I think there are a lot of ways that fathers and male role models carry a heavy responsibility for curbing violence against women. Obviously, not being violent towards women or condoning violence against women is important; but I think it is the subtler elements that are more challenging. Any adult relationship involves some power dynamics, some conflict, some resentment, and some plain old arguments. Moments like these are a recipe for men sending unfortunate messages to the boys who are watching. No one is at their best and most mindful when they are angry or resentful. As difficult as it may be sometimes, men need to remain cognizant of not take advantage of physical intimidation or other power manipulations when they are arguing with women. Such behavior sends a message to younger boys that when you are angry, might still makes right and it is ok to intimidate your way to make your point.

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015: Interview 1 – Munish Jauhar, 39, India

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2015 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our first “30 For 30″ 2015 Dad is Munish Jauhar from India.

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The Dad Bio

Munish Jauhar is the CEO/Founder of GrayCell Technologies Exports which he founded in 2004. Today, GrayCell has grown exponentially with a list of Global 2000 clients. Graycell is also an award-winning champion of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), providing strong support to initiatives like holding blood donation camps, tree plantation drives, charities for orphans and women in need.  An avid collector of both modern and contemporary Indian art, Munish’s other interests include reading, fish keeping, music and birding. He is married to Gurpreet and they have two daughters Bisr and Hunar.

PIC_95751. What is the best thing about being a dad?

That is a very tough question to answer because I love everything about being a dad, be it watching my girls smile, hearing their unconditional laughter, holding their hands, being a child again with them, or getting their special drawings every now and then. But if I had to pick one thing it is that fatherhood is unconditional love, it’s not all about ‘me’ but it is about ‘we’ a family.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

Yes, a father does have a very significant impact on their son’s attitude towards girls and women, but at the same time I feel the mother too has a very strong impact. My parents have had a very positive influence on me in this context because I was never raised to think that men and women are not equal and nor I have ever seen any domestic violence at home. Learning has to begin at home and it is the parents who have to lead by example.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

This is a big issue which impacts all of us either directly or indirectly. Positive male role models need to reach out to other males (young and old) who they know of in their immediate circles and educate them about this problem and bring about a change in their patriarchal mindsets. Young boys, while growing up, always look up to their fathers and father figures such teachers, mentors, uncles, older brothers etc. And it is precisely these role models who have to lead by example. We also have to get them to imbibe a ‘Pay It Forward’ attitude in this context.