Posts tagged Fathers

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015: Interview 4 – Steve Drew, 45, USA

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2014 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our fourth “30 For 30″ 2015 Dad is Steve Drew from the USA.

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The Dad Bio

Steve Drew is a business executive in the energy industry – focused on electricity and technology.  He is married to an Ecuadorian and the father of two well-travelled and balanced international kids. During free time, he volunteers to lead moderation of some of the largest speculative fiction and book-related sites on the web.  

Dad Daughter Zombie

1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

It’s the ability to share adventures every day, to rediscover life and what makes life so rewarding by helping a young girl and boy develop through experiences.  It has been so much fun and so rewarding to help direct energy, discover answers to questions, and to experience the world together.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

My parents were unusual in that my dad’s background is in sales and my mom is a high-powered PhD. His daily influence was that women are truly equals in life. A rugged, sometimes gruff outdoors kind of gent who treated my mother and other women with an unusual level of equality.  Definitely unusual for his generation in the US.

Through him, I learned that this was a preferable way to approach life and that views other than equality were to be adjusted and, where appropriate, confronted.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

This is all about education and building on experiences at home.  Both my son and daughter are being raised in a balanced way – to respect rights of other people and to fight for what is right in life.

Violence against women is real and most definitely is not a “women’s issue” – even though it is women who are more often impacted by violence.  My kids know that it is their responsibility at school or play to take care of others when situations of bullying or violence or unkind behaviour arise.  To recognise situations and either intervene and/or reach out to the right people to help out.  To act as role models on how people should treat other people.

It’s been fun and rewarding to see them take action when action is needed.

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015: Interview 3 – Leonard Storm Warren, 45, USA

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2015 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our third “30 For 30″ 2015 Dad is Leonard Storm Warren from the USA.

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The Dad Bio

I have a total of 5 children – 2 of which are adults now, a teenager who is 15, and 2 small children residing in the home with me. For years, I was a touring musical artist from 1998, till around 2012. When I had my last child (my son), I decided that it was time to become a totally dedicated father, and husband. Leaving the music life was one of the most difficult decisions that I’d ever had to make, but oh so worth it in terms of family value! I took up photography and videography. This allowed me to fill that void of needing to be an artist. To this day, my children and wife are very pleased with me,  they look up to me more now than ever before, and I in turn, try to be the best father and husband that I can be! 

1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

The best thing about being a dad is how valuable I am to my children. They learn most of their first things with me and I get to experience so many first accomplishments with them too.  As a Dad, I get to teach fundamentals that will assist my children as they learn to walk, then walk through life on their own, and they in turn pass these lessons down to their children too. When I hear my children calling me “Dad”, when I see the love that they have for me in their eyes, I know that I am their hero, and that means more to me than ANY amount of fame or money that I could ever possess. I thank God that I am healthy, I am happy, and I am in love… with my children.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

My father was pretty young when I was conceived. I remember him being there as much as he could. Mother and him were not married; they were just children themselves. I spent quite a few years with my father (away from mother). My dad was always a hardworking man. He always treated his woman like a queen. He had very low tolerance for playing around in school and disrespect at home. These are traits I adopted and passed on to my children as I began having a family.

The role never ends though, and as you get older, the situations change, like the times. The issues that a dad faces three years ago with this child, will be very different from the way a dad needs to deal with this same issue from his child this year. There is no manual to rearing a child. You gotta get in there and try to make the very best decisions for them – ones that will be fair, concise and intelligent.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

I believe fathers and older men can do this by showing young boys, young fathers, and young men that they don’t have to play the role of being overtly “Hard”. Society has bogged us down with the ideology that you must be HARD all the time.

I have heard so many people tell young people to say ‘please’, or ‘thank you’, and the kids act like it is a really difficult thing to say. I mean really? And music, media, all things around us seem to have a campaign to glorify the Bad Boy image. I truly believe that these things are really hurting our young men too. We are conditioning our children that it is wrong to outward and compassionate emotion, and to me that is wrong.

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015: Interview 2 – Jamie Rishikof, 40, Canada and the USA

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2015 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our second “30 For 30″ 2015 Dad is Jamie Rishikof from Canada and the USA.

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The Dad Bio

Jamie Rishikof is a clinical psychologist in private practice in the suburbs of Boston. He has owned and operated his own practice since 2006. He specialises in working with kids, teens, and parents. Jamie married Dianne (nee Scheinberg) in 2004. He became a dad in 2008 with the birth of his son, Carter, who was followed 3 years later by a daughter, Madison. Connecting with kids is an essential part of Jamie’s life and passion, and he brings that sensibility to his parenting. His children challenge him to be a better parent, and provide him with irreplaceable moments of sheer joy and wonder.

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1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

The best thing about being a dad is the mixture of emotions that comes from watching them each evolving into the person that they become. I have deeply loved them at each stage of development. In some ways, each is still the same person that they were a few years ago, with defining traits continuing and elaborating; but they are each also so different than they were just a couple of months ago, with a more distinct sense of personality. I can look back at that evolution and see a path from who they were to who they are. Yet, at the same time, they continue to surprise me. I love it as both of them continue to shake up my expectations of them. I find them to be continually charming, funny, and interesting people. While I carry some responsibility for trying to raise them well, I know so much more of that comes from their own nature, and so I feel quite fortunate and grateful.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

My father and I have a pretty solid relationship. We share a lot of sensibilities and traits, and I know a lot of my best and worst traits echo from him. In many ways we walk similar paths, as we wrestle with similar demons and strive toward similar ideals. My parents have a pretty impressive marriage. When I was growing up, I did not understand that, because that was normal for me. But I see now that my mother was pretty outspoken and assertive for a woman of her generation. The fact that my father married her and respected her as much as he does says a lot about his treatment of women. The fact that I have such high regard for the outspoken and assertive women in my life (including the one that my wife and I are raising) says a lot about what I learned from him about gender dynamics.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

First off, in my opinion, violence against women is primarily a male issue, since it is primarily a problem of male violent behavior.

I think there are a lot of ways that fathers and male role models carry a heavy responsibility for curbing violence against women. Obviously, not being violent towards women or condoning violence against women is important; but I think it is the subtler elements that are more challenging. Any adult relationship involves some power dynamics, some conflict, some resentment, and some plain old arguments. Moments like these are a recipe for men sending unfortunate messages to the boys who are watching. No one is at their best and most mindful when they are angry or resentful. As difficult as it may be sometimes, men need to remain cognizant of not take advantage of physical intimidation or other power manipulations when they are arguing with women. Such behavior sends a message to younger boys that when you are angry, might still makes right and it is ok to intimidate your way to make your point.

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2014 Interview 30: Stanley Diamond, 80, Canada

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2013! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2014 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our thirtieth “30 For 30″ 2014 Dad is Stanley Diamond from Canada.

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The Dad Bio

Stanley Diamond is a lecturer, author, and subject of articles on entrepreneurial activity and international marketing. He is the founder of the Jewish Genealogical Society of Montreal, founder and executive director of Jewish Records Indexing – Poland, and the creator of the research project on Beta-Thalassemia genetic trait in Ashkenazi Jewish families. Stanley is also a consultant on the television series “Who Do You Think You Are?” and “Finding Your Past,” and was featured in an episode of the documentary series “Past Lives” on Global TV Canada. In 1984, Stanley won the Canada Export Award and in 2002, he received the International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies Lifetime Achievement award. Stanley married Ruth Mirjam Peerlkamp in 1965 and has three daughters and four grandchildren.

DSCF1600 - Copy - Copy1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

At the end of the day, it is about being proud of your children at every stage of their lives and having the satisfaction that they reflect the values that you and your wife have instilled in them. It is also about being able to see that that they are caring citizens, have chosen friends wisely, and are loving and considerate individuals who, in turn, have brought up children that reflect upon themselves and their parents.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

My father and I were never “buddies” or had a “man-to-man” talk about any aspect of male/female relationships. Although I came to realize that he could not bring himself to provide guidance when it involved girls/women or how to treat them, he was always courteous with women and in this way, he did have an influence.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

It is the responsibility of all fathers, teachers, and males in authority in general to show their opposition to violence against women through words and deeds. Lists of ways of how to stop violence against women are all well and good but, in the end, it’s no more complicated than teaching your sons to obey the golden rule of treating women with respect, asking yourself if the behaviour you see meets that basic standard, and the importance of speaking up and speaking out if it doesn’t.

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2014 Interview 29: Alex Trainer, 47, USA

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2013! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2014 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our twenty ninth “30 For 30″ 2014 Dad is Alex Trainer from the USA.

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The Dad Bio

Alex is the proud father of a 16 year old daughter, Christel, and proud husband to his wife of 12 years. He believes the success to their marriage is due to the fact that Jesus Christ is the sovereign in their relationship, that He constructed it and sustains it. He believes that following Christ’s example of treating women without judgment (John 8:11), with love (Ephesians 5:25), and with gentleness is the best way to impact his daughter’s life.

Christel Whispers to Daddy 0504141503b1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

The best thing about being a dad is being able to teach my daughter the knowledge that I have learned, and knowing that I had a role in showing her how to expect to be treated by a man. My daughter will know that she is to be treated with dignity and respect, as well as what is right and wrong.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

My father was a college professor – introverted and shy, and a gentleman. I never heard him speak an unkind word to my mom or berate her. Instead, I saw a man who took the time to explain to her things she didn’t understand about American culture, which was important as she was a German immigrant. Though my father experienced much pain in his life, he never lashed out, put down, or threatened anyone when he was frustrated.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

One of the underlying causes of violence towards women is the lack of moral male leadership in the world. Many sons do not have men in their lives that they can actively listen to about how to encourage and support the women in their lives. Positive male role models for boys make solid, moral male men in the future – men who treat women with equality, respect, and dignity.

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2014 Interview 28: Andrew Smiler, 45, USA

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2013! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2014 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our twenty eighth “30 For 30″ 2014 Dad is Andrew Smiler from the USA.

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The Dad Bio

Andrew Smiler, PhD is a therapist, evaluator, author, and speaker residing in Winston-Salem, North Carolina (USA). He is the author of Challenging Casanova: Beyond the stereotype of promiscuous young male sexuality and co-author, with Chris Kilmartin, of The Masculine Self (5th edition). He is a past president of the Society for the Psychological Study of Men and Masculinity and has taught at Wake Forest University and SUNY Oswego. Dr. Smiler’s research focuses on definitions of masculinity. He also studies normative aspects of sexual development, such as age and perception of first kiss, first “serious” relationship, and first intercourse among 15-25 year olds.

20120410smiler69871. What is the best thing about being a dad?

The best thing about being a dad is when my daughter gives me a hug, kiss, or cuddle without being asked to do so. Whatever else is going on, that always makes me feel good and smile.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

My stepfather treated everyone, female or male, with respect. He was humble, never argued with my mother in front of me, and was good to her. As far as I could tell, my stepfather always kept his word, unlike my biological father. I try to treat people the same way my stepfather did.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

One way is to raise boys with the notion that girls are their equals, that boys should help everyone, and that boys need to stand up to other boys who belittle girls. Another way is not to use girls or femininity as a putdown or punishment; insulting a boy by telling him he “throws like a girl” teaches boys that girls are fundamentally different from and less than boys. If they hear that repeatedly, it can become the basis of their understanding of girls and women.

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2014 Interview 27: Glenn Jones, 49, USA

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2013! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2014 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our twenty seventh “30 For 30″ 2014 Dad is Glenn Jones from the USA.

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The Dad Bio

Glenn has worked in the A/C business for about 17 years as a Supervising Lead Installer. Though he does not have any hobbies, he enjoys being with his family every spare moment that he gets. He is the father of a 14-year-old son, named after him, and a 17-year-old up-and-coming artist named ToRi-LyNN who is one of The Pixel Project’s Music For Pixels artistes.

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1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

Everything is the best thing about being a dad! I had always wanted a family, even before I ever had one. I find it to be the most fulfilling experience of my life and wouldn’t trade it for anything in the world.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

My father, God rest his soul, always treated my mother and sister with a lot of love and respect. Those values and qualities always stuck with me. I thank my father for being a great role model and teaching me to be the man I am today.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

I feel this can only happen by everyone joining together and taking a strong stand in preventing violence against women from happening. I feel that males especially need to fight for this cause because it sets a good example for our men of the future to follow suit. For example, my daughter is working hard on building her music career and I am 100% supportive of her. I show her that I respect her opinions and ambitions, and that I want her and her younger brother to know that it is normal and right to expect any man to do the same.

Editor: Check out ToRI-LyNN’s latest anti-Violence Against Women music video for The Pixel Project:

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2014 Interview 26: Lee Keyes, Over 21, USA

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2013! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2014 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our twenty sixth “30 For 30″ 2014 Dad is Lee Keyes from the USA.

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The Dad Bio

Lee works at a major university as a psychologist, helping students and communities address mental health issues, including all forms of violence. He has been married for 29 years and have two adult children, whom he loves dearly.

Me & Kids

1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

Seeing my children become who they are, and their journey in giving their gifts to the world. I have tried to share the wisdom that I’ve accumulated about life by how I interact with the world in healthy ways. I enjoy teaching them to stand up for themselves, what they believe in, what is right as best as they know it, and to be respectful and honourable people. I like seeing them be their own, independent people, but also seeking support when that is needed.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

It was my mother who influenced me in seeing women and girls as equals. My father gave me an appreciation for our family history and our Scots-Irish cultural roots and I have tried to pass that on, but it was my mother who raised me to take care of myself and to focus on what I believe. Because she insisted on being treated fairly, I came to know that girls and women want the same, and I have tried to live up to that.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

Fathers and other male role models need to lead by example and reinforce the need for being responsible and accountable, even in situations of peer pressure. Because our evolution has primed our brains for certain negative behaviour, I know that boys need a lot of attention, monitoring, and reinforcement when they do the right thing and treat others with respect, even when they may not receive it themselves. It takes courage to speak up about wrongful treatment; men must nurture and promote those choices when they see them.

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2014 Interview 25: Randy Gregorcyk, 42, USA

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2013! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2014 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our twenty fifth “30 For 30″ 2014 Dad is Randy Gregorcyk from the USA.

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The Dad Bio

Randy is a working professional in the property management and safety industry. He is actively involved in a men’s soccer team, politically supports his community through various boards, and was recently a City Councilman. Randy and his wife adopted their daughter the day she was born. As the father of one daughter after painstakingly seeking a natural birth, he is thrilled to be a father with a great journey of leadership, love, and compassion through Christ ahead of him.

Randy and Emsley Pic1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

Experiencing unconditional love from my daughter is the best part of being a dad. At two and a half years old, I have already, and will continue, to experience a bond that only a father and daughter can have. Her blessing, love, and laughter has improved the world we live in and, to the end, I strive to equip her to be a contributor to our society.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

As a son, my father raised me to love, respect, and admire my mother. Because of this, my admiration and respect for women became key as a young adult and, more importantly, as a future husband. My wife could see the love that my father had for my mother and she later told me that part of her love for me was seeing those same characteristics in me. My father continues to influence my actions as a new father to Emsley and I am happy that I paid attention and can be an active father to her.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

Whether through church activities, school gatherings, or other community outreach options, we must lead by example and take interest in their lives. By partaking in positive community activities with our sons and daughters, we have the opportunity to surround them with positive role models and show them the positive characteristics that we hope to instil in them for the future.

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2014 Interview 24: Matt Gregory, 40, USA

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2013! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2014 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our twenty fourth “30 For 30″ 2014 Dad is Matt Gregory from the USA.

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The Dad Bio

Matt Gregory is the Associate Dean of Students and Director of Student Advocacy & Accountability at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Matt is the current President of the Association for Student Conduct Administration (ASCA). Matt has a Bachelor’s degree in Biological Sciences from Southern Illinois University, a Master’s degree in Counseling and Student Affairs from Western Kentucky University, and a Doctorate of Philosophy in Educational Administration from Southern Illinois University. His dissertation focused on male advocacy against sexual violence of women. Matt has over 12 years of experience in higher education administration and has 6 years of law enforcement experience. Matt is a certified Rape Aggression Defense (RAD) instructor. He is the father of one son and three daughters and enjoys trying to make them laugh as often as possible.

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1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

I have come to believe that the best thing about being a dad is watching your children’s personalities and identities emerge and develop. It is astonishing to see your own positive and negative personality attributes emerge in your own children. It is equally enjoyable to experience life all over again by viewing the world around you from their perspective and without the stressors of the adult world.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

As an adult male, I have not had what is perceived as a traditional childhood upbringing. My mother and father divorced when I was 4 years old and I was raised by my mother without a male figure in the house until I was 16 years old. Much of what I learned about the treatment of women came from my mother, my female friends, and loved ones, as well as through my own observations of both positive and negative examples of male treatment of women. During my own personal male initiation into manhood journey, I never lost sight of the feminine influence on my life. Now that I have a son, I try to help him find his own maleness while maintaining a deep regard and admiration for females.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

Violence against women is very much a societal issue. Some people would argue that sexual violence against women is entirely a female problem and that men have no place in such a dialogue. Based on research on sexual violence, it has been widely held that men are by and large the perpetrators of sexual violence. Because of this, dialogue intended to stop sexual violence must involve men. It is imperative for prominent men in our schools, work, towns, states, and nation to publicly speak out and engage other men toward stopping violence against women. Further, it is absolutely essential that these men live their lives as active examples of positive maleness, demonstrating regard, respect, and admiration of women.