Posts tagged Male Role Model

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015: Interview 6 – Christopher Johnson, 43, United States

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2015 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our sixth “30 For 30″ 2015 Dad is Christopher Johnson from the USA.

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The Dad Bio

I live in Las Vegas Nevada with my wife and 3 children. I have a 17-year old son – Westin, and 2 daughters – Abbie – 13, and Emma – 10. I am in the technology field and serve as Chief Operating Officer of 2 technology companies that are based here in the valley. We have 2 dogs, a snake, a turtle, and a fish. I enjoy spending time with my family on weekends and spending good leisure time in and around our house and neighbourhood.

Family-2013_cropped1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

Feeling like you make a difference! I feel like every conversation, every action, every lesson is something that is absorbed by my children and leaves an impression. With that comes stress as well, but I think it is so amazing and inspiring to leave a lasting impression on someone.

One of the biggest highs I get is feeling that after I am gone, my kids will reflect different elements of my time with them in their lives as they live on. It is a powerful feeling to know you have impacted a child in a positive manner.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

My father and my mother divorced when I was around 2 years old, but one memory that lasted with me was that he always referred to her in a very positive light and said that she was amazing. This type of acknowledgement of a woman’s importance and guidance was very impactful to me and led to my overall perception of how a woman should be treated.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

It sounds simplistic, but open candid conversation with your children is critical. When children are little, they fight. This is common among all nationalities. I think it is important when kids get to their juvenile years that we enforce the importance of never physically or mentally abusing a woman. I really feel like we emphasise it when we discuss the day’s events or a particular topic around someone being mistreated. It is certainly not something that we shy away from discussing as a family and in a very open and direct manner.

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015: Interview 5 – Eoin Loughrey, 31, UK

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2015 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our fifth “30 For 30″ 2015 Dad is Eoin Loughrey from the UK.

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The Dad Bio

I am a proud first time Dad to my baby daughter, Iris. She is three months old and she is great. I love football and I can’t wait to take her for a kickabout at the park when she is older. I am an animator working in the games industry, currently working on a PS4 game. I am Irish but have been living in the UK for ten years. I live in the Midlands with my wife, our daughter and our two cats.

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1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

The amount of love you feel for your child. The first time they smile at you is incredible. It also adds a new dimension to your relationship with your partner. You have a new respect for each other and it’s interesting to see how well you can work together as a team.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

My parents have an equal partnership and treat each other with respect and that has influenced how I treat people. I’m finding it hard to give specific examples for this question but my parents have always made decisions together and they split work around the house fairly.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

I think men need to not remain silent if someone is, for example, talking in a derogatory way about women.

Men also need to lead by example and get involved: They can set a good example to their children by doing their share of domestic chores. They can encourage their children to play games and build interests in things that are not traditionally assigned to their gender.

Violence against women can only be stopped if everyone takes the issue seriously.

 

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015: Interview 4 – Steve Drew, 45, USA

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2014 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our fourth “30 For 30″ 2015 Dad is Steve Drew from the USA.

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The Dad Bio

Steve Drew is a business executive in the energy industry – focused on electricity and technology.  He is married to an Ecuadorian and the father of two well-travelled and balanced international kids. During free time, he volunteers to lead moderation of some of the largest speculative fiction and book-related sites on the web.  

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1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

It’s the ability to share adventures every day, to rediscover life and what makes life so rewarding by helping a young girl and boy develop through experiences.  It has been so much fun and so rewarding to help direct energy, discover answers to questions, and to experience the world together.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

My parents were unusual in that my dad’s background is in sales and my mom is a high-powered PhD. His daily influence was that women are truly equals in life. A rugged, sometimes gruff outdoors kind of gent who treated my mother and other women with an unusual level of equality.  Definitely unusual for his generation in the US.

Through him, I learned that this was a preferable way to approach life and that views other than equality were to be adjusted and, where appropriate, confronted.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

This is all about education and building on experiences at home.  Both my son and daughter are being raised in a balanced way – to respect rights of other people and to fight for what is right in life.

Violence against women is real and most definitely is not a “women’s issue” – even though it is women who are more often impacted by violence.  My kids know that it is their responsibility at school or play to take care of others when situations of bullying or violence or unkind behaviour arise.  To recognise situations and either intervene and/or reach out to the right people to help out.  To act as role models on how people should treat other people.

It’s been fun and rewarding to see them take action when action is needed.

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015: Interview 3 – Leonard Storm Warren, 45, USA

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2015 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our third “30 For 30″ 2015 Dad is Leonard Storm Warren from the USA.

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The Dad Bio

I have a total of 5 children – 2 of which are adults now, a teenager who is 15, and 2 small children residing in the home with me. For years, I was a touring musical artist from 1998, till around 2012. When I had my last child (my son), I decided that it was time to become a totally dedicated father, and husband. Leaving the music life was one of the most difficult decisions that I’d ever had to make, but oh so worth it in terms of family value! I took up photography and videography. This allowed me to fill that void of needing to be an artist. To this day, my children and wife are very pleased with me,  they look up to me more now than ever before, and I in turn, try to be the best father and husband that I can be! 

1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

The best thing about being a dad is how valuable I am to my children. They learn most of their first things with me and I get to experience so many first accomplishments with them too.  As a Dad, I get to teach fundamentals that will assist my children as they learn to walk, then walk through life on their own, and they in turn pass these lessons down to their children too. When I hear my children calling me “Dad”, when I see the love that they have for me in their eyes, I know that I am their hero, and that means more to me than ANY amount of fame or money that I could ever possess. I thank God that I am healthy, I am happy, and I am in love… with my children.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

My father was pretty young when I was conceived. I remember him being there as much as he could. Mother and him were not married; they were just children themselves. I spent quite a few years with my father (away from mother). My dad was always a hardworking man. He always treated his woman like a queen. He had very low tolerance for playing around in school and disrespect at home. These are traits I adopted and passed on to my children as I began having a family.

The role never ends though, and as you get older, the situations change, like the times. The issues that a dad faces three years ago with this child, will be very different from the way a dad needs to deal with this same issue from his child this year. There is no manual to rearing a child. You gotta get in there and try to make the very best decisions for them – ones that will be fair, concise and intelligent.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

I believe fathers and older men can do this by showing young boys, young fathers, and young men that they don’t have to play the role of being overtly “Hard”. Society has bogged us down with the ideology that you must be HARD all the time.

I have heard so many people tell young people to say ‘please’, or ‘thank you’, and the kids act like it is a really difficult thing to say. I mean really? And music, media, all things around us seem to have a campaign to glorify the Bad Boy image. I truly believe that these things are really hurting our young men too. We are conditioning our children that it is wrong to outward and compassionate emotion, and to me that is wrong.

“30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015: Interview 2 – Jamie Rishikof, 40, Canada and the USA

Welcome to The Pixel Project’s “30 For 30″ Father’s Day Campaign 2015! In honour of Father’s Day, we created this campaign:

  • To acknowledge the vital role Dads play in families, cultures and communities worldwide.
  • To showcase good men from different walks of life who are fabulous positive non-violent male role models.

Through this campaign, we will be publishing a short interview with a different Dad on each day of the month of June.

This campaign is also part of a programme of initiatives held throughout 2015 in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that is in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate via the Pixel Reveal website here or the Pixel Reveal Razoo donation page here.

Our second “30 For 30″ 2015 Dad is Jamie Rishikof from Canada and the USA.

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The Dad Bio

Jamie Rishikof is a clinical psychologist in private practice in the suburbs of Boston. He has owned and operated his own practice since 2006. He specialises in working with kids, teens, and parents. Jamie married Dianne (nee Scheinberg) in 2004. He became a dad in 2008 with the birth of his son, Carter, who was followed 3 years later by a daughter, Madison. Connecting with kids is an essential part of Jamie’s life and passion, and he brings that sensibility to his parenting. His children challenge him to be a better parent, and provide him with irreplaceable moments of sheer joy and wonder.

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1. What is the best thing about being a dad?

The best thing about being a dad is the mixture of emotions that comes from watching them each evolving into the person that they become. I have deeply loved them at each stage of development. In some ways, each is still the same person that they were a few years ago, with defining traits continuing and elaborating; but they are each also so different than they were just a couple of months ago, with a more distinct sense of personality. I can look back at that evolution and see a path from who they were to who they are. Yet, at the same time, they continue to surprise me. I love it as both of them continue to shake up my expectations of them. I find them to be continually charming, funny, and interesting people. While I carry some responsibility for trying to raise them well, I know so much more of that comes from their own nature, and so I feel quite fortunate and grateful.

2. A dad is usually the first male role model in a person’s life and fathers do have a significant impact on their sons’ attitude towards women and girls. How has your father influenced the way you see and treat women and girls?

My father and I have a pretty solid relationship. We share a lot of sensibilities and traits, and I know a lot of my best and worst traits echo from him. In many ways we walk similar paths, as we wrestle with similar demons and strive toward similar ideals. My parents have a pretty impressive marriage. When I was growing up, I did not understand that, because that was normal for me. But I see now that my mother was pretty outspoken and assertive for a woman of her generation. The fact that my father married her and respected her as much as he does says a lot about his treatment of women. The fact that I have such high regard for the outspoken and assertive women in my life (including the one that my wife and I are raising) says a lot about what I learned from him about gender dynamics.

3. Communities and activists worldwide are starting to recognise that violence against women is not a “women’s issue” but a human rights issue and that men play a role in stopping the violence. How do you think fathers and other male role models can help get young men and boys to take an interest in and step up to help prevent and stop violence against women?

First off, in my opinion, violence against women is primarily a male issue, since it is primarily a problem of male violent behavior.

I think there are a lot of ways that fathers and male role models carry a heavy responsibility for curbing violence against women. Obviously, not being violent towards women or condoning violence against women is important; but I think it is the subtler elements that are more challenging. Any adult relationship involves some power dynamics, some conflict, some resentment, and some plain old arguments. Moments like these are a recipe for men sending unfortunate messages to the boys who are watching. No one is at their best and most mindful when they are angry or resentful. As difficult as it may be sometimes, men need to remain cognizant of not take advantage of physical intimidation or other power manipulations when they are arguing with women. Such behavior sends a message to younger boys that when you are angry, might still makes right and it is ok to intimidate your way to make your point.

The “30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days” Interview – Tori-Lynn

As part of  The Pixel Project’s 30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days” project in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign, we talk to the artistes who have participated in the project about why they are using their music to speak out and to say NO to violence against women. 

Our twenty-fifth featured artiste is ToRi-LyNN (born Tori Lynn Jones) has performed for many live audiences as a young aspiring pop artist. Her most recent performances have been at Sun Life Stadium in front of 17,000 people for Dan Marino’s Walk For Autism, the grand opening game for the newly built Marlins Park Stadium with invitation from Gloria and Emilio Estefan, and Camp Jam where she has performed for as many as 6,000 kids. She has also gained exposure being seen performing at various venues and events for the South Florida & Dade County Fairs, Joe DiMaggio Children’s Hospital, and many American Cancer Society Relay For Life charity events. Her involvement with Relay For Life has also earned her an award entitled, “Certificate of Appreciation”, in recognition for her commitment, dedication and support for the 2011 Relay For Life, which was presented to her at Florida Memorial University. 

Tori-Lynn has debuted two of her own original singles, “Labyrinth of Love” & “Nobody But Me“. Some of her major influences and support have been her family, close friends, and most importantly, her fans. However, Tori-Lynn’s biggest influence and inspiration has been her younger brother, Glenn, who battles a very rare genetic disease called Cystinosis, for whom she had dedicated her first single, “Labyrinth of Love” to. She hopes to be well known enough to the whole world one day to help spread the word about this rare life threatening, incurable disease, and to help people be aware and support this cause. Tori-Lynn believes that determination and hard work is the key to success, and she’s ready to share her talent with the world. Follow Tori-Lynn on Facebook and Twitter, or check out her videos on YouTube

Tori-Lynn contributed her cover of Sara Bareilles’s “Brave”, to the “30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days” campaign in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate here.

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Tori Lynn

Tell us about yourself and why you decided to take part in The Pixel Project’s “30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days” project.

My name is ToRi-LyNN. I am a 17 year old up-and-coming artist who lives in the South Florida area. I’ve performed for many live audiences as a young aspiring pop artist. My most recent performances have been with Tunes For Tots in raising funds for the Make A Wish Foundation, Sun Life Stadium in front of 17,000 people for Dan Marino’s Walk For Autism, the grand opening game for the newly built Marlins Park Stadium with invitation from Gloria and  Emilio Estefan, and Camp Jam where I’ve performed for as many as 6,000 kids. I have also gained exposure being seen performing at various venues and events for the South Florida and Dade County Fairs, Joe DiMaggio Children’s Hospital, and many American Cancer Society Relay For Life charity events.

As you can see, I have done many different charity events and have shown my support, as an artist, for many different organisations. This is who I am, and this is what I love to do. I have decided to take part in the Pixel Project because I feel strongly for the cause, and truly believe in what they are trying to accomplish.

Violence against women needs to end! I hear far too many women and teen age girls going through this, and I want to help take a stand against it. It’s an outrage to me, and it just needs to stop!

Why is ending violence against women important to you?

This is important to me because I hear way too much of this going on with women and teenage girls. I have also had a couple of my friends go through some sort of violent act, whether it be mental or physical abuse. I see the way teenage boys are treating girls today, and it’s as though they are not as respectful as they should be. I feel if it starts with them being disrespectful, it will just escalate from there.

In your opinion how does music help in efforts to end violence against women?

Music ALWAYS sends a message, and I feel it’s the best way to get our point across. People listen to music every day, and in my eyes, it is the best way to voice out your emotions for everything and anything in life.

What actions can music artistes take to help end violence against women?

Many actions can be taken and accomplished with music to help end violence against women. Music is the soundtrack of our lives. Music says it all in such a way that people want to listen over and over again. Music expresses our feelings and gets our point across worldwide. Music always makes a difference and voices out our emotions in what we are trying to say and do. So with that being said, I feel music is the most productive way to promote a cause and get results.

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The “Music For Pixels 2014″ charity digital album is available from 1 April 2014 – 1 April 2015 as a companion to the “30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days” campaign. The album features a selection of 12 positive and empowering songs from the campaign by artistes including  Adam Web, AHMIR, AJ Rafael, Bob Sima, Courtney Jenae, Debbie Reifer, Delaney Gibson, Ellis, Macy Kate, Mary Sholz, Pete Ahonen, and Troy Horne

The album is the perfect and affordable gift for music lovers and for celebrating special occasions such as birthdays and Mother’s Day. It is available for download worldwide via major online music retailers including iTunes and Amazon.com. 100% of the album proceeds will benefit The Pixel Project to help keep their anti-Violence Against Women campaigns, projects, and programmes running.

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The “30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days” Interview – Teri Rambo

As part of  The Pixel Project’s 30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days” project in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign, we talk to the artistes who have participated in the project about why they are using their music to speak out and to say NO to violence against women. 

Our twenty-fourth featured artiste is Teri Rambo. Part confessor, part philosopher and all heart, Teri Rambo writes and sings with bittersweet transparency, disarming sincerity and a wink of good humor. Teri’s distinct vocal sound was featured in the Barrymore award-winning production of In the Next Room or the vibrator play (2011 – Wilma Theater, Philadelphia PA). Her song Say Something won an Honorable Mention in the 2012 New England Songwriting Competition. Teri’s debut album, Say Something, released 12/13/13, represents the best of two decades’ original writing. Follow Teri on Facebook or check out her videos on YouTube

Teri contributed her song, “Gone Too Soon” to the “30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days” campaign in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate here.

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Teri Rambo

Tell us about yourself and why you decided to take part in The Pixel Project’s “30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days” project.

I am a singer/songwriter and mom to an eight year old girl.  Naturally, I oppose any kind of violence toward women and girls and was honoured to be included in the 30/30/30 project!  If my song softens even one heart or inspires one person into action to protect the rights of women, what a gift to the world!

Why is ending violence against women important to you?

Needless to say, women and girls deserve the respect and human rights afforded to men and boys.  Every oppressor has a mother to whom he owes his life. Violence against or control of women is the ultimate insult and injustice.  The world is in need of so much healing and defending the rights of women and girls is a fine place to start.

In your opinion how does music help in efforts to end violence against women?

Music has a way of touching hearts and inspiring action…it is a language that is often able to penetrate where words alone cannot.  Music helps people to feel, connect and relate, and this is a powerful tool for spreading the message of anti-violence while honouring women and girls.

What actions can music artistes take to help end violence against women?

As artists, we can donate our music, time and talent to organisations that benefit women and girls.  We can dig deeply and create work that brings people together and helps us relate to each other.  As a female artist, just by sharing my music with the world, I can inspire other women and girls to let their lights shine and share their hearts and truths with the world.

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The “Music For Pixels 2014″ charity digital album is available from 1 April 2014 – 1 April 2015 as a companion to the “30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days” campaign. The album features a selection of 12 positive and empowering songs from the campaign by artistes including  Adam Web, AHMIR, AJ Rafael, Bob Sima, Courtney Jenae, Debbie Reifer, Delaney Gibson, Ellis, Macy Kate, Mary Sholz, Pete Ahonen, and Troy Horne

The album is the perfect and affordable gift for music lovers and for celebrating special occasions such as birthdays and Mother’s Day. It is available for download worldwide via major online music retailers including iTunes and Amazon.com. 100% of the album proceeds will benefit The Pixel Project to help keep their anti-Violence Against Women campaigns, projects, and programmes running.

bt-m4p2014-dl-amazon                   bt-m4p2014-dl-itunes

The “30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days” Interview – Shane Cooley & Paulo Franco

As part of  The Pixel Project’s 30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days” project in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign, we talk to the artistes who have participated in the project about why they are using their music to speak out and to say NO to violence against women. 

Our twenty-third featured artistes are Shane Cooley and Paulo Franco

Shane grew up in rural Virginia, where he soon found solace in music.  By the time he was 13, he was already performing live. After graduating with a BA in English at The College of William and Mary, he took to the road, booking his own tours solo and in collaboration with other artists across the United States.  Shane also did a tour in Europe, covering Germany, The Netherlands and England.  In September he re-located from Virginia to the Austin, Texas, where he’s always making music. Follow Shane on Facebook or check out his videos on YouTube

Paulo is a Richmond, Virginia based singer/songwriter, whose music has been featured on radio stations in Richmond, WNRN in Charlottesville, and Hampton Roads, VA.  His music draws heavily from influences like Steve Earle, the Gram Parsons inspired music of the Rolling Stones, and The Grateful Dead. The music tells tales of love and loss, introspection and redemption, and the journey that is life itself. Head on over to Paulo’s website for more information.

Shane and Paulo contributed his song, “Married In A Black Dress” to the “30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days” campaign in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate here.

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Shane Cooley and Paulo Franco

Tell us about yourself and why you decided to take part in The Pixel Project’s “30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days” project.

Shane: I’ve been writing songs and making music most of my life, and have pretty much been on the road since I graduated college in 2010.  I grew up in rural Virginia, and recently I re-positioned myself in Austin, TX, where I am putting finishing touches on my upcoming solo album.  I met my friend Paulo Franco when I was spending time in Richmond, and we recently released an EP of co-writes, including “Married in a Black Dress,” which we chose to use as our contribution to the 30/30/30 Campaign.

Paulo and I both believe in the power of song, and I’ve seen music perform miracles on many occasions throughout my travels.  We hope our small contribution to this cause inspires and uplifts.  Violence against anyone is senseless, and we are in an era that has no excuse for not being self-aware of right and wrong.

Why is ending violence against women important to you?

Shane: I personally support this campaign to end violence against women because I feel like it is my duty as an artist to report the human condition.  I don’t underestimate the power of art and song, and I hope this project not only reaches its goals, but that it reaches women everywhere with inspiration and empowerment.

In your opinion how does music help in efforts to end violence against women?

Shane: I’m more convinced than ever that those who create can have a world of influence on others. Art doesn’t have to be blatant to affect someone, but the message has to be there. I write about a variety of things, but what my songs mean to me doesn’t matter nearly as much as the interpretations others draw from them. We artists tend to be intimidated by things like the music industry and the games within, but when it comes down to it, touching the life of someone in need is more important than any record deal.  Keep making art for the humanity of it… that’s why it exists in the first place.

What actions can music artistes take to help end violence against women?

Shane: There is too much beauty in the world to sit back and allow the ugly to reign.  I commend every artist who is involved in this for their empathy and strength to take action.

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The “Music For Pixels 2014″ charity digital album is available from 1 April 2014 – 1 April 2015 as a companion to the “30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days” campaign. The album features a selection of 12 positive and empowering songs from the campaign by artistes including  Adam Web, AHMIR, AJ Rafael, Bob Sima, Courtney Jenae, Debbie Reifer, Delaney Gibson, Ellis, Macy Kate, Mary Sholz, Pete Ahonen, and Troy Horne

The album is the perfect and affordable gift for music lovers and for celebrating special occasions such as birthdays and Mother’s Day. It is available for download worldwide via major online music retailers including iTunes and Amazon.com. 100% of the album proceeds will benefit The Pixel Project to help keep their anti-Violence Against Women campaigns, projects, and programmes running.

bt-m4p2014-dl-amazon                   bt-m4p2014-dl-itunes

The “30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days” Interview – Pete Ahonen

As part of  The Pixel Project’s 30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days” project in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign, we talk to the artistes who have participated in the project about why they are using their music to speak out and to say NO to violence against women. 

Our twenty-second featured artiste is Pete Ahonen. Pete is an East Bay native / singer-songwriter — pairing his blend of ‘alt-country / folk-rock’ with an incredible knack for storytelling. Pete says: “When I was a kid , maybe just 5 years old, I was obsessed with this little push-button guitar. It only played ‘twinkle twinkle little star’ but every time I hit that button I felt like Jimi Hendrix! My mom gave me the guitar that she used to mess around with in high school and the obsession is still going! I’ve played everything from intense studio sessions, to festivals, to Jam bands… My favorite moments in life are being part of the music while its happening. Its almost like your not playing music, but you are the music!” To find out more about Pete, follow him on Facebook

Pete contributed his song, “Picture In My Pocket” to the “30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days” campaign in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate here.

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Pete Ahonen

Tell us about yourself and why you decided to take part in The Pixel Projects 30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days project.

I am a songwriter from the Bay Area, California. I originally wanted to be a part of the pixel project because I’d written a song pertaining to slavery and hoped it could be used in some way to help.

Your heart and your music together have a way of becoming stagnant if you’re just thinking about yourself all the time. You see all these musicians who make a lot of money, who have big record contracts, and who are just too self-focused. I believe that we weren’t created this way – we were made to give pieces of ourselves back to others and I hope this song can do that in some way.

Why is ending violence against women important to you?

Violence against women is far too accepted in our male dominated culture – people are affected everywhere, they’re scared and full of fear. I see it all the time, in my neighbourhood. People do things because it was done to them. If you see it in your house when you’re growing up, it’s so easy to continue that trend in your life. You’re not even conscious of it. If you’re living your life in fear, you’re not being all that you could be; you’re not doing what you could be doing, because you’re afraid. It steals your potential, it steals your right to love and be loved in the way you’re meant to. It’s not a predestined thing though, and the cycle can be undone. We can be whoever we want to be in life. It’s in the way we live, the way we are and the way we treat other people.

In your opinion how does music help in efforts to end violence against women?

Everywhere around the world women in particular are victims of violence of some form. We need to give people the right information, skills and opportunities to take action when women’s rights are violated or compromised.  With music, there’s a way to reach people that you may not normally reach, I mean, everyone listens to music. Music can help end violence because the words and melodies can influence and challenge the soul.

What actions can music artistes take to help end violence against women?

Artists and performers should carry their strong anti -violent messages to the ears of the people who follow them… and word spreads like wildfire. You want all people to have access to this information. It affects all walks of life to different degrees. Musicians can help because they have an outlet that others don’t have, and when people hear music that they relate to, it confirms how they feel and gives them hope or brings some fight back in them. If you can create a song that brings a shot of vigour into the life of somebody who needs it, in my opinion, you’ve done your job.

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The “Music For Pixels 2014″ charity digital album is available from 1 April 2014 – 1 April 2015 as a companion to the “30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days” campaign. The album features a selection of 12 positive and empowering songs from the campaign by artistes including  Adam Web, AHMIR, AJ Rafael, Bob Sima, Courtney Jenae, Debbie Reifer, Delaney Gibson, Ellis, Macy Kate, Mary Sholz, Pete Ahonen, and Troy Horne

The album is the perfect and affordable gift for music lovers and for celebrating special occasions such as birthdays and Mother’s Day. It is available for download worldwide via major online music retailers including iTunes and Amazon.com. 100% of the album proceeds will benefit The Pixel Project to help keep their anti-Violence Against Women campaigns, projects, and programmes running.

bt-m4p2014-dl-amazon                   bt-m4p2014-dl-itunes

The “30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days” Interview – Scott Johnson

As part of  The Pixel Project’s 30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days” project in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign, we talk to the artistes who have participated in the project about why they are using their music to speak out and to say NO to violence against women. 

Our twenty-first featured artiste is Scott Johnson. Scott is the Executive Director of the Positive Music Association which he co-founded in 2003, an international organization promoting positive music artists and positive music as a distinct genre of music. Positive music is defined as music of all styles with universal, life-affirming messages.  In 2012, Scott founded World Singing Day in an effort to bring the world together through song. In 2013, he received the Kathy Gee Award for Outstanding Support of Positive Music. He has released 6 CDs of his own music, from children’s music and a special CD for hospice to positive pop/rock music.  Scott is also a life coach, graphic designer, and author. He lives in Boulder, Colorado with his wife and their two college-age daughters. To find out more about Scott and Positive Music Association, click here

Scott contributed his song, “Right This Moment” to the “30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days” campaign in support of the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign that in benefit of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project. Donate at just US$1 per pixel to reveal the mystery Celebrity Male Role Models and help raise US$1 million for the cause while raising awareness about the important role men and boys play in ending violence against women in their communities worldwide. Donations begin at just US$10 and you can donate here.

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Scott JohnsonTell us about yourself and why you decided to take part in The Pixel Projects 30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days project.

As a songwriter of life-affirming music, and the founder of the Positive Music Association and World Singing Day, I know the power that music has to empower and uplift people. The Pixel Project also knows the power of music and is wisely using it to stop violence against women around the globe. It was a natural fit for me to be involved in this wonderful campaign.

Why is ending violence against women important to you?

I’m married to a healthy, confident woman and together, we have raised two bright, independent daughters. Violence against women is not only wrong, it makes it difficult for women to live out their full potential and contribute fully to society. We need healthy, strong girls and women for humanity to thrive.

In your opinion how does music help in efforts to end violence against women?

Music is the international language. It speaks to people of all cultures and nationalities. By promoting music that empowers and uplifts people, especially girls and women, we are paving the way for more healthy thoughts and attitudes toward women to take hold in our societies.

What actions can music artistes take to help end violence against women?

Sing about it. Write songs about the issue. Through their lyrics, artists can help girls and women have new beliefs about themselves that are empowering. Popular artists especially need to lead the way in sending positive messages to girls and women.

————————————————————————————————–

The “Music For Pixels 2014″ charity digital album is available from 1 April 2014 – 1 April 2015 as a companion to the “30 Artistes, 30 Songs, 30 Days” campaign. The album features a selection of 12 positive and empowering songs from the campaign by artistes including  Adam Web, AHMIR, AJ Rafael, Bob Sima, Courtney Jenae, Debbie Reifer, Delaney Gibson, Ellis, Macy Kate, Mary Sholz, Pete Ahonen, and Troy Horne

The album is the perfect and affordable gift for music lovers and for celebrating special occasions such as birthdays and Mother’s Day. It is available for download worldwide via major online music retailers including iTunes and Amazon.com. 100% of the album proceeds will benefit The Pixel Project to help keep their anti-Violence Against Women campaigns, projects, and programmes running.

bt-m4p2014-dl-amazon                   bt-m4p2014-dl-itunes